Quotes by Author
L
Martin Luther

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Henry Labouchere

I do not waste my time in answering abuse; I thrive under it like a field that benefits from manure.-Henry Labouchere (1935 - ____)

Catherine Laboure

I knew nothing; I was nothing. For this reason God picked me out.-- Catherine Laboure

Jean de La Bruyere (1645 &endash; 1696)

Two quite opposite qualities equally bias our minds - habit and novelty. La Bruyere.

We must laugh before we are happy, for fear we die before we laugh at all. Jean de La Bruyere

Pierre Ambroise Francois Choderlos, de LaClos

Revenge is a dish best served cold. --Pierre Ambroise Francois Choderlos, de LaClos [1741-1803],_Les Liaisons Dangereuse

Suzanne LaFollette

There is nothing more innately human than the tendency to transmute what has become customary into what has been divinely ordained. Suzanne LaFollette

Jean de la Fontaine (1621 &endash; 1695)

Everyone believes very easily whatever they fear or desire. - Jean de la Fontaine (1621 &endash; 1695)

No path of flowers leads to glory. -- Jean de La Fontaine

Rene Theophile Hyacinthe LaÎnnec (1781-1826)

Do not fear to repeat what has already been said. Men need the truth dinned into their ears many times and from all sides. The first rumor makes them prick up their ears, the second registers, and the third enters.Rene Theophile Hyacinthe LaÎnnec (1781-1826)

Anthony Lake

I will try to follow the advice that a university president once gave a prospective commencement speaker. "Think of yourself as the body at an Irish wake" he said. "They need you in order to have the party, but no one expects you to say very much." -- Anthony Lake, 1995

Alphonse de Lamartine (1790 &endash; 1869)

The more I see of the representatives of the people, the more I admire my dogs.- Alphonse de Lamartine

There is a woman at the beginning of all great things.-- Lamartine

Grief and sadness knits two hearts in closer bonds than happiness ever can; and common sufferings are far stronger than common joys.~Alphonse de Lamartine

Charles Lamb. 1775-1834

Here cometh April again, and as far as I can see the world hath more fools in it than ever. - Charles Lamb

For thy sake, tobacco, I
Would do anything but die.
Charles Lamb. 1775-1834. A Farewell to Tobacco.

This is my motto: Contented with little, yet wishing for more.Charles Lamb (1775-1834)

Pain is life - the sharper, the more evidence of life.Charles Lamb (1775-1834)

How sickness enlarges the dimensions of man's self to himself. --Charles Lamb (1775-1834) _Last Essays of Elia_ [1883], "The Convalescent"

Mad. de Lambert

The pleasures of the world are deceitful; they promise more than they give. They trouble us in seeking them, they do not satisfy us when possessing them, and they make us despair in losing them.--Mad. de Lambert

Giuseppe Tomasi de Lampedusa (1896 -1957)

If we want things to stay as they are, things will have to change. - Giuseppe Tomasi de Lampedusa (1896 -1957)

Ann Landers

Don't accept your dog's admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful. -Ann Landers

A successful marriage is not a gift; it is an achievement. - Ann Landers, 1918 - 2002

Letitia Elizabeth Landon

We need to suffer that we may learn to pity. -- Letitia Elizabeth Landon

Walter Savage Landor (1775 &endash; 1864)

Study is the bane of childhood, the oil of youth, the indulgence of adulthood, and a restorative in old age.-- Walter Savage Landor 1775 &endash; 1864

Andrew Lang (1844-1912)

He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lampposts - for support rather than illumination. Andrew Lang (1844-1912)

J. A. Langford

The love of books is a love which requires neither justification, apology, or defense.
J. A. Langford, "The Praise of Books" (1880).

Kurt Langner

Love is a gift. You can't buy it, you can't find it, someone has to give it to you. Learn to be receptive of that gift.-- Kurt Langner

Daniel Lapin

I desperately want my children, and one day (God willing) my grandchildren and their descendants, to have the option of living peacefully and productively in the United States of America. I am certain this depends upon America regaining its Christian - oriented moral compass. - Rabbi Daniel Lapin, America's Real War

...the choice is between a benign Christian culture and a sinister secular one. - Rabbi Daniel Lapin, America's Real War p.14

I am neither a prophet nor a movie critic. I am merely an Orthodox rabbi using ancient Jewish wisdom to make three predictions about The Passion. First: Mel Gibson and Icon Productions will make a great deal of money. Those distributors who surrendered to pressure from Jewish organizations and passed on The Passion will be kicking themselves, while Newmarket Films will laugh all the way to the bank. Theater owners are going to love this film. Second: The Passion will become famous as the most serious and substantive Biblical movie ever made. It will be one of the most talked-about entertainment events in history. My third prediction is that the faith of millions of Christians will become more fervent as The Passion uplifts and inspires them. The Passion will propel vast numbers of unreligious Americans to embrace Christianity. The movie will one day be seen as a harbinger of America's third great religious reawakening. Those Jewish organizations that have squandered both time and money futilely protesting The Passion, ostensibly in order to prevent pogroms in Pittsburgh, can hardly be proud of their performance. They failed at everything they attempted. They were hoping to ruin Gibson rather than enrich him. They were hoping to suppress The Passion rather than promote it. Finally, they were hoping to help Jews rather than harm them. --The Dividers The Passion's critics fail. By Rabbi Daniel Lapin http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/lapin200402250902.asp

Once Mel Gibson revealed himself to be, like the president, a person of serious religious faith, the gloves came off. Mel Gibson has done a major favor for serious faith, both Jewish and Christian, in America. He has made it "cool" to be religious, but in so doing he has unleashed the hatred of secular America against himself personally, against his work and against his family. God bless him. ---Rabbi Daniel Lapin, "Why Jewish groups passionately hate Mel Gibson" http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=37963

With perhaps one in five Americans already having seen it, "The Passion" continues to rack up attendance records. Would you like to hear an amazing statistic? In spite of dire warnings by some Jewish groups, no Jews wending their way homewards from the synagogue have been set upon by crucifix-wielding Christians intent on wreaking revenge for the death of Jesus. I am not being sarcastic. This truly is an amazing statistic. According to Boston police reports, the Oliver Stone-Quentin Tarantino 1994 "Natural Born Killers" inspired several imitation murders, including a firefighter killed by a man who claimed to be fascinated by the film. Nathaniel White claimed that "Robocop" showed him how to kill five women and one girl in a year-long murder spree. Four young gunmen embarked on a killing spree, murdering four after watching the TV movie "Helter Skelter," a film about the Manson murders. The annals of American crime are filled with instances of the unbalanced and the demented acting out silver screen slashing extravaganzas.
Back in February, when "The Passion" was released, would anyone have been willing to guarantee that out of millions of theatergoers, not one lunatic would emerge with mayhem on his mind? I would have offered no such guarantee. Yet, nothing of the sort happened. What did happen is that several criminals were inspired to confess their crimes and submit to trial and incarceration after experiencing "The Passion."
Even the most hostile critic must concede that just as depraved films stimulate degenerate imitation, so do uplifting films stimulate noble behavior. That is certainly what has been happening with "The Passion." Wouldn't it be uplifting and even noble were the Jewish groups who earlier had insulted "The Passion," its maker, the Gospels that inspired it and indeed all Christians, now to issue an apology? -- Rabbi Daniel Lapin, "Jewish activists: Apologize to Mel" http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=38197

Ralph Lapp

No one--not even the most brilliant scientist alive today--really knows where science is taking us. We are aboard a a train which is gathering speed, racing down a track on which there are an unknown number of switches leading to unknown destinations. No single scientist is in the engine cab and there may be demons at the switch. Most of society is in the caboose looking backward.- Ralph Lapp, Quoted in the Dust of Death by Os Guiness 1973

Marie Louise De La Ramee (1839 &endash; 1908)

There are many moments in friendship, as in love, when silence is beyond words. The faults of our friend may be clear to us, but it is well to seem to shut our eyes to them.... Friendship is usually treated by the majority of mankind as a tough and everlasting thing which will survive all manner of bad treatment. But this is an exceedingly great and foolish error; it may die in an hour of a single unwise word.--- Marie Louise De La Ramee

Could we see when and where we would meet again, we would be more tender when we bid our friends goodbye. Ouida (Maria Louise [de la] Ramee) (1839 &endash; 1908)

Philip Larkin (1922-1985)

Far too many relied on the classic formula of a beginning, a muddle, and an end.
Philip Larkin (1922-1985) Referring to modern novels; "New Fiction," 15 Jan 1978.

Always too eager for the future, we
Pick up bad habits of expectancy.
Something is always approaching; every day
Till then we say,

Watching from a bluff the tiny, clear
Sparkling armada of promises draw near.
How slow they are! And how much time they waste,
Refusing to make haste!

Yet still they leave us holding wretched stalks
Of disappointment, for, though nothing balks
Each big approach, leaning with brass work prinked,
Each rope distinct,

Flagged, and the figurehead with golden tits
Arching our way, it never anchors; it's
No sooner present than it turns to past.
Right to the last

We think each one will heave to and unload
All good into our lives, all we are owed
For waiting so devoutly and so long.
But we are wrong:

Only one ship is seeking us, a black-
Sailed unfamiliar, towing at her back
A huge and birdless silence. In her wake
No waters breed or break.
Philip Larkin, Next Please

Francois de La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680)

However evil men may be they dare not be openly hostile to virtue, and so when they want to attack it they pretend to find it spurious, or impute crimes to it. --La Rochefoucauld, _Maxims_, 1665

The most untutored person with passion is more persuasive than the most eloquent without. - François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, 1613 - 1680

The true way to be deceived is to think oneself more clever than others.--La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680)_Reflections; or, Sentences and Moral Maxims_ [1678], Maxim 127

Quarrels would not last long if the fault were only on one side. La Rochefoucauld, Maxims

The fame of great men ought to be judged always by the means they used to acquire it. --- Francois de La Rochefoucauld

We all have the strength to endure the misfortunes of others. --La Rochefoucauld

Silence is the safest course for any man to adopt who distrusts himself.--La Rochefoucauld

It is much easier to suppress a first desire than to satisfy those that follow -- La Rochefoucauld

As one grows older, one becomes wiser and more foolish. -- La Rochefoucauld

The only thing constant in life is change. Francois de La Rochefoucauld

It is not enough to have great qualities, we should also have the management of them. -- Francois de La Rochefoucald

Hypocrisy is the homage paid by vice to virtue. Francois duc de la Rochefoucauld 1613-1680 Les Maximes 218

Absence diminishes small loves, and increases great ones, as the wind blows out the candle and fans the bonfire.
Francois duc de la Rochefoucauld 1613-1680

Happiness and misery depend as much on temperament as on fortune.--- Francois, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Reflexions ou Sentences et Maximes Morales

Doug Larson

There are worse things than getting a call for the wrong number at 4 AM. It could be the right number.- Doug Larson

The reason people blame things on previous generations is that there's only one other choice. Doug Larson

Elliott Larson

Anger always comes from frustrated expectations. - Elliott Larson

Affirmative action is the attempt to deal with malignant racism by instituting benign racism. -- Elliott Larson

Tommy Lasorda

When we lose, I eat. When we win, I eat. I also eat when we're rained out. -- Tommy Lasorda

Hugh Latimer

Be of good comfort Master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle by God's grace in England, as (I trust) shall never be put out.--Hugh Latimer

He is the most diligent preacher of all other; he is never out of his diocese.--Hugh Latimer, _Sermons_, 1549

Frank C. Laubach

There is a deep peace that grows out of illness and loneliness and a sense of failure. God cannot get close when everything is delightful. He seems to need these darker hours, these empty-hearted hours, to mean the most to people. Frank C. Laubach

Russell W. Laughlin

I can make ANY cat go "woof". All you need is some gasoline and a match! -- Russell W. Laughlin

Vernon Law

Experience is the worst teacher; it gives the test first before presenting the lesson. --Vernon Law

William Law (1686-1761)

Receive every day as a resurrection from death, as a new enjoyment of life; meet every rising sun with such sentiments of God's goodness, as if you had seen it, and all things, new-created upon your account: and under the sense of so great a blessing, let your joyful heart praise and magnify so good and glorious a Creator.
William Law, A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life [1728]

There is nothing that makes us love a man so much as praying for him. --William Law (1686-1761)

This is true Christian resignation to God, which requires no more to the support of it than such a plain assurance of the goodness of God as Abraham had of His veracity. And if you ask yourself what greater reason Abraham had to depend upon the Divine veracity than you have to depend upon the Divine goodness, you will find that none can be given. ... William Law, A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life [1728]

Wonder not then that all the true followers of Christ, the saints of every age, have so gloried in the cross of Christ, have imputed such great things to it, have desired nothing so much as to be partakers of it, to live in constant union with it. It is because His sufferings, His death and cross, were the fulness of His victory over all the works of the devil. Not an evil in flesh and blood, not a misery of life, not a chain of death, not a power of hell and darkness, but were all baffled, broken, and overcome by the process of a suffering and dying Christ. Well, therefore, may the cross of Christ be the glory of Christians!
William Law (1686-1761), The Spirit of Love

If you were to rise early every morning, as an instance of self-denial, as a method of renouncing indulgence, as a means of redeeming your time and of fitting your spirit for prayer, you would find mighty advantages from it. This method, though it seem such a small circumstance of life, would in all probability be a means [toward] great piety. It would keep it constantly in your head that softness and idleness were to be avoided and that self-denial was a part of Christianity... It would teach you to exercise power over yourself, and make you able by degrees to renounce other pleasures and tempers that war against the soul. ... William Law, A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life [1728]

Humility is nothing else but the right judgment of ourselves. --William Law

Brother Lawrence (c.1605-1691)

The sorest afflictions never appear intolerable, but when we see them in the wrong light: when we see them in the hand of God, Who dispenses them; when we know that it is our loving Father who abases and distresses us; our sufferings will lose their bitterness and become even a matter of consolation.
Brother Lawrence (c.1605-1691)

There is not in the world a kind of life more sweet and delightful than that of a continual walk with God. Those only can comprehend it who practice and experience it; yet I do not advise you to do it from that motive.... Brother Lawrence (c.1605-1691)

D H Lawrence (1895 &endash; 1930)

And still I look for the men who will dare to be
roses of England
wild roses of England
men who are wild roses of England
with metal thorns, beware!
but still more brave and still more rare
the courage of rosiness in a cabbage world
fragrance of roses in a stale stink of lies
rose-leaves to bewilder the clever fools
and rose-briars to strangle the machine.
D H Lawrence, 'Rose and Cabbage'

Be still when you have nothing to say; when genuine passion moves you, say what you've got to say, and say it hot. -- D.H. Lawrence

John Lawrence

Many Christians are reluctant to become involved in public affairs be cause politics is a "dirty business", but the same people are generally quite happy to go into business life, which is in its way just as "dirty". If the dubious practices and moral compromises of every walk of life were dissected and made known with the glare of publicity which shines on the activities of politicians, then those who like to think that they can keep their hands clean would have very few professions to choose from. John Lawrence, Hard Facts [1958]

Thomas Edward Lawrence

All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did.
Thomas Edward Lawrence --Seven Pillars of Wisdom Suppressed Introductory Chapter

Ken Lay

Our performance has never been stronger our business model has never been more robust. We have the finest organization in American business today. -- Ken Lay, Chairman and Chief Executive, Enron Corporation (14 Aug 2001 e-mail to employees

Emma Lazarus

Life's sharpest rapture is surcease of pain.-- Emma Lazarus

Stephen Butler Leacock (1869-1944)

I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it."- Stephen Butler Leacock (1869-1944)

Frank Leahy (1908- )

Egotism is the anesthetic that dulls the pain of stupidity. --Frank Leahy (1908- ) _Look_ [January 10, 1955]

William Leahy

The atom bomb will never go off - and I speak as an expert in explosives. U.S. Admiral William Leahy in 1945

Paul Leary

That's what's cool about working with computers. They don't argue, they remember everything and they don't drink all your beer.-- Paul Leary, 1991

Timothy Leary (1920 &endash; 1996)

There are three side effects of acid. Enhanced long term memory, decreased short term memory, and I forget the third.
Timothy Leary

Robert Keith Leavitt

People don't ask for facts in making up their minds. They would rather have one good soul-satisfying emotion than a dozen facts. Robert Keith Leavitt

Fran Lebowitz

Food is an important part of a balanced diet. -- Fran Lebowitz

Inhabitants of underdeveloped nations and victims of natural disasters are the only people who have ever been happy to see soy beans. Fran Lebowitz

Success didn't spoil me; I've always been insufferable. Fran Lebowitz

Vegetables are interesting but lack a sense of purpose when unaccompanied by a good cut of meat. --Fran Lebowitz

Life is something to do when you can't get to sleep. Fran Lebowitz

Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he is buying.-Fran Lebowitz

There are many things you can learn from children, like how many patience you have for instance (Fran Lebowitz)

My favorite animal is steak -Fran Lebowitz

Stanislaw Lec, (1909-1966)

Man is fatally slow on the uptake; it always takes him until the next generation to understand what's going on. ~Stanislaw Lec, (1909-1966)

Is it progress if a cannibal uses a fork? Stanislaw J. Lec, Unkempt Thoughts (1962

Alexandre Auguste Ledru-Rollin

Let me pass! I have to follow them; I am their leader.--Alexandre Auguste Ledru-Rollin, 15 May 1848.

Blaine Lee

...power is not really good or bad; it is neutral. Power itself is not negative or positive, although our feelings about it may be. Power is the potential to influence others for good or evil, to be a blessing or a scourge. Like nuclear energy, it can provide the electricity to light a city, or it can fuel the bomb that destroys it. -Blaine Lee

Robert E. Lee (1807 &endash; 1870)

Whiskey&emdash;I like it, I always did, and that is the reason I never use it. - Robert E. Lee (1807 &endash; 1870)

Robert Lefevre

Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure. -- Robert Lefevre

Jim Leffel

It's not that Christianity has been refuted by scientific fact or historical scrutiny. Rather, it's considered implausible because it claims to be universally and objectively true--that is, true for everybody. Put simply, the Christian message violates today's carefully cultivated incredulity toward all absolutes, especially religious ones. --Jim Leffel

Ursula K. Le Guin

Reason is a faculty far larger than mere objective force. When either the political or the scientific discourse announces itself as the voice of reason, it is playing God, and should be spanked and stood in the corner. --Ursula K. Le Guin, 1986

Rosamond Lehmann

One can present people with opportunities. One cannot make them equal to them. --Rosamond Lehmann

Robert Leighton

The flower that follows the sun does so even in cloudy days.-- Robert Leighton

Carol Leifer

Whenever I travel I like to keep the seat next to me empty. I found a great way to do it. When someone walks down the aisle and says to you, "Is someone sitting there?" just say, "No one-except the Lord." Carol Leifer

Karl Lembke

Civil society depends on people agreeing to two things: Don't deliberately give offense to others, and don't be too easily offended. Too few people are giving any thought to either.-Karl Lembke

Madeleine L'Engle

The great thing about getting older is that you don't lose all the other ages you've been.~Madeleine L'Engle

This is the irrational season
When love blooms bright and wild.
Had Mary been filled with reason
There'd have been no room for the child.
~Madeleine L'Engle, in The Weather of the Heart. (1978)

It's a good thing to have all the props pulled out from under us occasionally. It gives us some sense of what is rock under our feet, and what is sand. - Madeleine L'Engle (1918-____)

Vladimir Ilich Lenin (1870-1924)

We deny all morality taken from super-human or non-class conceptions. We say that this is a deception, a swindle, a befogging of the minds of the workers and peasants in the interests of the landlords and capitalists. --Lenin, speech, October 2, 1920

We need the real, nation-wide terror which reinvigorates the country and through which the Great French Revolution achieved glory.--Lenin, 1908

Freedom is a bourgeois prejudice. We repudiate all morality which proceeds from supernatural ideas or ideas which are outside the class conception. In our opinion, morality is entirely subordinate to the interests of the class war. Everything is moral which is necessary for the annihilation of the old exploiting order and for uniting the proletariat. Our morality consists solely in close discipline and conscious warfare against the exploiters. --V.I. Lenin

John Lennon (1940 &endash; 1980)

Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans~John Lennon, _Beautiful Boy__Double Fantasy_album (1980).

Christianity will go. It will vanish and sink. I needn't argue about that. I'm right and will be proved right. We're more popular than Jesus now. I don't know which will go first - rock'n'roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right, but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It's them twisting it that ruins it for me.~John Lennon 4th March 1966

The unknown is what it is. And to be frightened of it is what sends everybody scurrying around chasing dreams, illusions, wars, peace, love, hate, all that. Unknown is what it is. Accept that it's unknown, and it's plain sailing. - John Lennon, 1940 - 1980

Jay Leno (1950-)

You can't stay mad at somebody who makes you laugh.--Jay Leno

Leo the Great (390?-461)

Invisible in His own nature [God] became visible in ours. Beyond our grasp, He chose to come within our grasp.... Leo the Great (390?-461)

Leo XIII

It is not lawful for the State...to hold in equal favor different kinds of religion....The equal toleration of all religions...is the same thing as atheism. Leo XIII: Immortale Dei, Nov.1,1885

John Leo

Post-1960s liberalism has lost its communal sensibility and now talks almost exclusively of autonomy and rights, not obligation or moral accountability. ...it has aggressively labored to devalue society by trying to banish moral and religious discourse from the public arena. Even the famous liberal belief in openness, tolerance and free speech now looks like a discarded belief. Witness all the disinvited speakers, stolen newspapers and current not-very-liberal efforts to silence Dr. Laura Schlessinger and derecognize campus Christian groups.--John Leo, 2000

America still doesn't understand what has happened to its colleges. A strong and implacably non-diverse campus culture has arisen around very dangerous ideas. Among them are radical cultural relativism, non-judgmentalism, and a post-modern conviction that there are no moral norms or truths worth defending -- all knowledge and morality are constructions built by the powerful. Add to this the knee-jerk antagonism to the "hegemony" of the West and a reflexive feeling of sympathy for anti-Western resentments, even those expressed in violence. This is a toxic mix, and it is now crucial for those both on and off the campus to start saying so.-- John Leo, October 1, 2001, http://www.townhall.com/columnists/johnleo/jl20011001.shtml

 

Pedro de Cieza de Leon

In the vicinities of Quito the inhabitants have with to the maize an other plant that serves to support in great part their existence: the potatoes, that they are of the roots similar to the tubercoli, supplies of one rind more or little hard; when they come bubbled they become to hold like the cooked chestnuts; seccate to the sun call to them chuno and they are conserved for the use. - Pedro de Cieza de Leon 1540

 Alan Jay Lerner

Why can't a woman be more like a man?
Men are so honest, so thoroughly square
Eternally noble, historically fair
Who when you win will always give your back a pat
Why can't a woman be like that?
Alan Jay Lerner, lyric , A Hymn to Him

Mark Leslie

Do not ride in cars: they are responsible for 20% of all fatal accidents. . . Do not stay at home: 17% of all accidents occur in the home. . . Do not walk on the streets or pavements: 14% of all accidents occur to pedestrians. . . Do not travel by air, rail, or water: 16% of all accidents happen on these. . . Only .001% of all deaths occur in worship services in church, and these are usually related to previous physical disorders. . . Hence the safest place for you to be at any time is at church! -- Mark Leslie via Sermon Fodder <Sermon_Fodder-owner@onelist.com>

Doris Lessing (1919- )

Political correctness is the natural continuum from the party line. What we are seeing once again is a self-appointed group of vigilantes imposing their views on others. It is a heritage of communism, but they don't seem to see this.--Doris Lessing

Should a single disappointed hope make us so hostile towards the world?-Lessing

Gotthold Lessing (1729 &endash; 1781)

Should a single disappointed hope make us so hostile towards the world?-Lessing

Elmer G. Letterman

A man may fall many times but he won't be a failure until he says someone pushed him. - Elmer G. Letterman

Oliver Letwin

There are advocates of state secularism who propose a 'neutral' non-religious basis for the constitution and institutions of society. But can a non-religious worldview ever be neutral? Surely it must embrace values of some sort, otherwise our national symbols would symbolise nothing and provide no basis for unity. A truly secular constitution rests on the fundamental assumption either that there is no God, or that the concept of God is utterly irrelevant to public life. The secular worldview is therefore neither neutral nor inclusive. Like any religious view, it imposes a set of assumptions on everyone who plays a part in public life. - Oliver Letwin MP  E pluribus unum - agreeing to differ http://www.conservatives.com/news/article.cfm?obj_id=58240

We start from the idea that different faiths have an equal right to co-exist. We move on to conflate this proposition with the claim that all faiths are equally valid. From this point it is argued that exclusive claims to the truth by any one faith undermine the validity of other faiths and thus their right to coexist. Finally, exclusive claims to truth are seen as a basis for intolerance, which, the power of the state should be used to counter, or at least discourage.Hence the attack on faith schools from those who speak as if Muslim schools had caused riots in places were no such schools exist; or as if Catholic schools were tearing Scotland apart; or as if parish schools could bring sectarian conflict to the English shires. That such attacks should continue in the face of all the facts, testifies to a prejudice that has no place in our constitution. - Oliver Letwin MP  E pluribus unum - agreeing to differ http://www.conservatives.com/news/article.cfm?obj_id=58240

Ours is an inheritance that has stood the test of time. If it is tstand the test of the future, it needs to be celebrated and taught in the media, in academe and in our schools. I wonder how many children are taught that Britain was the first nation to abolish the slave trade &endash; and that for much of the nineteenth century the prime duty of the Royal Navy was to stop the slave trade of other nations?
I fear that, at present, it has become fashionable not to speak of such things. I fear it is more likely that our children will be shown the low points of our history than the high. It is more likely that they will take away a sense of shame, than of pride. Oliver Letwin MP  E pluribus unum - agreeing to differ http://www.conservatives.com/news/article.cfm?obj_id=58240

In particular, our symbols are permeated by a religious tradition. It used to be said "there ain't no black in the Union Jack". Well, there ain't no Crescent neither. Nor, for that matter, no Star of David nor any religious symbol, but the Cross. - Oliver Letwin MP  E pluribus unum - agreeing to differ http://www.conservatives.com/news/article.cfm?obj_id=58240

In the last six years there has been an all but unseen revolution in our jurisprudence. Six hundred years of common and statute law, the law that has defined and upheld our liberty, has been subjected to the unpremeditated effects of the incorporation of the European Convention of Human Rights, through the Human Rights Act and its sequel &endash; the de facto incorporation of a suite of international treaties signed by prerogative power. The interaction of this quiet revolution with the other revolutionary development &endash; of European law &endash; has begun to pose fundamental questions about the conceptual integrity of our legal system and about the relationship between our judiciary, our Parliament and our democracy.
Where once our freedoms were built up layer by layer through the subtle interpretation of the courts and the democratic deliberations of Parliament, they are now subject to the intricate overlay of treaty upon treaty, generality upon generality.
I fear that if we do not begin to act now, to re-establish a structure of constitutional law and a doctrine of rights consonant with our history, we may in the not too distant future find ourselves losing liberties that we presently enjoy.
I fear that, perhaps without the will of Parliament or people being expressed, we may find faith schools loosing the freedom to choose their pupils, orthodox synagogues being stripped of charitable status if they keep out female rabbis, mosques being fined if they employ only Muslims. And I wonder, if in ten years time, it will still be legal to proclaim Jesus Christ as the only way to heaven, a proposition from which I dissent but which I wish to preserve the right of others to utter.
There are other threats to our liberties: the European Arrest Warrant; a restricted right to trial by jury; an end to the double jeopardy rule. Everywhere I look, I see around me the evidence of a need to enshrine our liberties, to delineate and protect the independence of our judiciary, to set out in some perspicuous form the constitutional relationships that protect us from tyranny.
We may not yet appreciate the freedoms we have today, but we will do if they are taken away from us. We may not yet appreciate the history of tolerance and respect &endash; the history of agreeing to differ &endash; that we have forged in this country. But if we begin to see it crumble, we will long for its return.
Let us begin to prevent now the need for such nostalgia and such longings in time to come. Let us reaffirm and enshrine in a new and more robust form the substance of our most precious inheritance &endash; the inheritance of liberty under the rule of law.
And let us, in so doing, provide for the whole nation a means by which the many can become one without ceasing to be many. Let us build a nation that upholds the freedom of each community, so that in return each community may uphold the nation.
Oliver Letwin MP  E pluribus unum - agreeing to differ http://www.conservatives.com/news/article.cfm?obj_id=58240

Oscar Levant

I once said cynically of a politician, "He'll double-cross that bridge when he comes to it.--Oscar Levant

She's a lovely person. She deserves a good husband. Marry her before she finds one. Oscar Levant to Harpo Marx upon meeting Harpo's fiancée

Happiness isn't something you experience; it's something you remember. Oscar Levant

Every time I look at you I get a fierce desire to be lonesome.-- Oscar Levant

Sam Levenson (1911 - 1980)

The reason grandparents and grandchildren get along so well is that they have a common enemy.--Sam Levenson (1911 - 1980)

Any kid who has two parents who are interested in him and has a houseful of books isn't poor. -- Sam Levenson

The simplest toy, one which even the youngest child can operate, is called a grandparent. Sam Levenson

Bernard Levin

The peaceful two [John Lennon & Yoko] argued, reasonably enough, that if everyone stayed in bed, occupying themselves in growing their hair, there would be no wars. - Bernard Levin, 'The Pendulum Years' 1976

Joseph E. Levine

You can fool all the people all of the time if the advertising is right and the budget is big enough. - Joseph E. Levine

Michael Levine

Pessimism wilts everything around it.-- Michael Levine

I've always found it fascinating that the suicide rate of handicapped people is far less than of those not handicapped.-- Michael Levine

Some ideas are so stupid that only intellectuals could believe them. Michael Levine

Leonard Louis Levinson

He is a fine friend. He stabs you in the front. -- Leonard Louis Levinson

George Henry Lewes (1817-1878)

The true function of philosophy is to educate us in the principles of reasoning and not to put an end to further reasoning by the introduction of fixed conclusions.- George Henry Lewes (1817-1878) The Biographical History of Philosophy.

Science is the systematic classification of experience.- George Henry Lewes (1817-1878)

The only cure for grief is action. -- George Henry Lewes (1817-1878) The Spanish Drama.

Many a genius has been slow of growth. Oaks that flourish for a thousand years do not spring up into beauty like a reed.- George Henry Lewes (1817-1878) The Spanish Drama.

Bernard Lewis

In every era of human history, modernity, or some equivalent term has meant the ways, norms, and standards of the dominant and expanding civilization. Every dominant civilization has imposed its own modernity in its prime. The Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman Empire, the medieval Christendoms, and Islam, as well as the ancient civilizations of India and China, all imposed their norms over a wide area and radiated their influence over a much broader on, far beyond their imperial frontiers. Islam was the first to make significant progress toward what it perceived as its universal mission, but modern Western civilization is the first to embrace the whole planet. Today, for the time being, as Ataturk recognized and as Indian computer scientists and Japanese high-tech companies appreciate, the dominant civilization is Western,and Western standards therefore define modernity.--Bernard Lewis, _What Went Wrong? - Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response_, cr. 2002, Oxford University Press

Secularism in the Christian world was an attempt to resolve the long and destructive struggle of church and state. Separation, adopted in the American and French Revolutions and elsewhere after that, was designed to prevent two things: the use of religion by the state to reinforce and extend its authority; and the use of the state power by the clergy to impose their doctrines and rules on others. This is a problem long seen as purely Christian, not relevant to Muslims or for that matter to Jews, for whom a similar problem has arisen in Israel. Looking at the contemporary Middle East, one must ask whether this is still true--or whether Muslims and Jews may perhaps have caught a Christian disease and might therefore consider a Christian remedy. --Bernard Lewis, _What Went Wrong? - Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response_, cr. 2002, Oxford University Press

 ...most Muslim countries are still profoundly Muslim, in a way and in a sense that most Christian countries are no longer Christian. Admittedly, in many of these countries, Christian beliefs and the clergy who uphold them are still a powerful force, and although their role is not what it was in past centuries,it is by no means insignificant. But in no Christian country at the present time can religious leaders count on the degree of belief and participation that remains normal in Muslim lands. In few, if any, countries do Christian sanctities enjoy the immunity from critical comment or discussion that is accepted as normal even in ostensibly secular and democratic Muslim societies. Indeed, this privileged immunity has been extended, de facto, to Western countries where Muslim communities have been established and where Muslim beliefs and practices are accorded a level of immunity from criticism that the Christian majorities have lost and the Jewish minorities never had. Most important, with very few exceptions, the Christian clergy do not exercise or even claim the kind of public authority that is still normal and accepted in most Muslim countries. --Bernard Lewis, _The Crisis of Islam_

There was another, perhaps more important, factor driving bin Ladin. In the past, Muslims fighting the West could always turn to the enemies of the West for comfort, encouragement, and material and military help. Now, for the first time in centuries, there is no such useful enemy. Bin Ladin and his cohorts soon realized that, if they wished to fight America they would have to do it themselves. In 1991, the same year that the Soviet Union ceased to exist, bin Ladin and his cohorts created Al-Qa'ida, which included many veterans of Afghanistan. Their task may have seemed daunting to anyone else, but they did not see it that way. In their view, they had already driven the Russians out of Afghanistan, in a defeat that was so overwhelming that it led directly to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Having overcome the superpower that they had always regarded as more formidable, they felt ready to take on the other; in this they were encouraged by the opinion, often expressed by bin Ladin among others, that America was a paper tiger. Muslim terrorists had been driven by such beliefs before. One of the most surprising revelations in the memoirs of those who held the American Embassy in Tehran from 1979 to 1981 was that there original intention had been to hold the building and hostages for only a few days. They changed their minds when statements from Washington made it clear that there was no danger of serious action against them. They finally released the hostages, they explained, only because they feared that the president-elect, Ronald Reagan, might approach the problem "like a cowboy." --Bernard Lewis, _The Crisis of Islam_

C S Lewis (1898-1963)

An individual Christian may see fit to give up all sorts of things for special reasons -- marriage, or meat, or beer, or cinema; but the moment he starts saying the things are bad in themselves, or looking down his nose at other people who do use them, he has taken the wrong turning. C S Lewis, Mere Christianity

If nothing in this world satisfies me, perhaps it is because I was made for another world.      C. S. Lewis 

Affection is responsible for nine-tenths of whatever solid and durable happiness there is in our lives. - Clive Staples Lewis, The Four Loves

The best men in the estate of grace would be in darkness, and call their estate into question, if the Holy Ghost did not convince them, and answer all cavils for them; and therefore we must not only be convinced at first by the Spirit, but in our continued course of Christianity. This, therefore, should make us come to God's ordinances with holy devotion. O Lord, vouchsafe the Spirit of revelation, and take the scales from mine eyes, that as these are truths, they may be truthIf you read history, you will find that the Christians who did the most for the present world were just those who thought the most of the next.--C.S. Lewis

If Darwin´s theory of Evolution was correct, cats would be able to operate a can-opener by now. --C.S. Lewis

One reason why people find [Life-Force religion] so attractive is itgives one much of the emotional comfort of believing in God and none of the less pleasant consequences. When you are feeling fit and the sun is shining and you do not want to believe that the whole universe is a mere mechanical dance of atoms, it is nice to be able to think of this great mysterious Force rolling on through the centuries and carrying you on its crest. If, on the other hand, you want to do something rather shabby, the Life-Force, being only a blind force, with no morals and no mind, will never interfere with you like that troublesome God we learned about when we were children. The Life- Force is a sort of tame God. You can switch it on when you want, but it will not bother you. All the thrills of religion and none of the cost. Is the Life-Force the greatest achievement of wishful thinking the world has yet seen? ~C.S. Lewis, "Mere Christianity".

We are quite ignorant of the real power of our habits until we try to give them up. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _Letter to Mrs. Percival Wiseman_ [May 26, 1942]

Jill transported to the land of Aslan is stranded in a strange forest because of pride and foolishness. She becomes extremely thirsty, finds a stream but a lion is there. The Lion bids her to come and drink. The voice was not like a man's but "deeper, wilder, and stronger" - a "sort of heavy golden voice". "May I - could I - would you mind going away while I do?", said Jill. The Lion answered this only by a look and a very low growl. And as Jill gazed at its mountainous bulk, she realized that she might as well have asked the whole mountain to move aside for her convenience. The delicious rippling noise of the stream was driving her nearly frantic. "Will you promise not to - do anything to me if you do come?", said Jill. "I make no promise, " said the Lion. Jill was so thirsty now that, without noticing it, she had come a step nearer. "Do you eat girls?", she said. "I have swallowed up girls and boys, women and men, kings and emperors, cities and realms", said the Lion. It didn't say this as if it were boasting, nor as if it were sorry, nor as if it were angry. it just said it. 'I daren't come and drink", said Jill. "Then you will die of thirst", said the Lion. "Oh dear!", said Jill coming a step nearer. "I supposed I must go and look for another stream then." "There is no other stream", said the Lion. C. S. LEWIS, Silver Chair

In the chapter, "Farewell to Shadowlands," the children are afraid of being sent away from Narnia. Aslan assures them that they will not - and a wild hope rises in them. Aslan tells them that there was a real railway accident. "Your father and mother and all of you are -- as you used to call it in the Shadowlands -- dead. The term is over: the holiday has begun. The dream is ended. This is the morning...things that began to happen after that were so great and beautiful that I cannot write them. And as for us, this is the end of all stories, and we can most truly say that they all lived happily ever after. But for them it was only the beginning of the real story. All their life in this world and all their adventures in Narnia have only been the cover of the Great Story which none on earth has read; which goes on forever, in which every chapter is better than the one before." C. S. LEWIS, Last Battle

I am a democrat because I believe in the Fall of Man. I think most people are democrats for the opposite reason. A great deal of democratic enthusiasm descends from the ideas of people like Rousseau, who believed in democracy because they thought mankind so wise and good that everyone deserved a share in the government. The danger of defending democracy on these grounds is that they are not true....Mankind is so fallen that no man can be trusted with unchecked power over his fellows. Aristotle said that some people were only fit to be slaves. I do not contradict him. But I reject slavery because I see no men fit to be masters.  CS Lewis

He's [God] a hedonist at heart...He makes no secret of it; at His right hand are pleasures forevermore...He's vulgar, Wormwood. He has bourgeois mind. There are things for humans to do all day long...sleeping, eating, drinking, making love, playing, praying, working. Everything has to be twisted before it's of any use to us. C. S. LEWIS, Screwtape Letters

Cowardice, alone of all the vices, is purely painful -- horrible to anticipate, horrible to feel, horrible to remember; Hatred has its pleasures. -- _The Screwtape Letters_

In a sense it (Christianity) creates, rather than solves, the problem of pain, for pain would be no problem unless side by side with our daily experience of this painful world, we had received what we think a good assurance that ultimate reality is righteousness and loving. C. S. LEWIS, THE PROBLEM OF PAIN

We may think God wants actions of a certain kind, but God wants people of a certain kind. C. S. LEWIS, Mere Christianity

Autumn is really the best of the seasons; and I'm not sure that old age isn't the best part of life. But of course, like autumn, it doesn't last. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _Letters of C.S. Lewis_ [1966], "27 October 1963"

What we have been told is how we men can be drawn into Christ - can become part of that wonderful present which the young Prince of the universe wants to offer to His Father that present which is Himself and therefore us in Him. It is the only thing we were made for. And there are strange, exciting hints in the Bible that when we are drawn in, a great many other things in Nature will begin to come right. The bad dream will be over: it will be morning. ... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), Mere Christianity [1952]

It does not matter how small the sins are, provided that their cumulative effect is to edge the man away from the Light and out into the Nothing. Murder is no better than cards if cards can do the trick.~C.S. Lewis 1898-1963, The Screwtape Letters (1941)

We ought to give thanks for all fortune: if it is "good," because it is good; if "bad" because it works in us patience, humility and contempt of this world and the hope of our eternal country. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963)_Letter to Don Giovanni Calabria_ [August 10, 1948]

We ought to give thanks for all fortune: if it is good, because it is good; if bad, because it works in us patience, humility, contempt of this world and the hope of our eternal country.- C.S. Lewis

It is only when you are asked to believe in Reason coming from non-reason that you must cry Halt. Human minds. They do not come from nowhere. ~ C.S. Lewis 1898-1963 , Miracles (1947)

Chastity is the most unpopular of the Christian virtues. There is no getting away from it; the old Christian rule is, "Either marriage, with completely faithfulness to your partner, or else total abstinence. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _Mere Christianity_ [1952], Book III, Chapter 5

We must never speak to simple, excitable people about "the Day" without emphasizing again and again the utter impossibility of prediction. We must try to show them that that impossibility is an essential part of the doctrine. If you do not believe our Lord's words, why do you believe in His return at all? And if you do believe them, must you not put away from you, utterly and forever, any hope of dating that return? ... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), The World's Last Night

God could, had He pleased, have been incarnate in a man of iron nerves, the Stoic sort who lets no sigh escape him. Of His great humility He chose to be incarnate in a man of delicate sensibilities who wept at the grave of Lazarus and sweated blood in Gethsemane. Otherwise, we should have missed the great lesson that it is by his will alone that a man is good or bad, and that feelings are not, in themselves, of any importance. We should also have missed the all important help of knowing that He has faced all that the weakest of us face, has shared not only the strength of our nature but every weakness of it except sin. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _Letters of C.S. Lewis_ [1966], "23 February 1947"

What will you do with Jesus,
Neutral you can not be,
One day your heart will be asking,
What will He do with me.
C. S. LEWIS

I . . . strongly object to the tyrannic and unscriptural insolence of anything that calls itself a Church and makes teetotalism a condition of membership. Apart from the more serious objection (that our Lord himself turned water into wine and made wine the medium of the only rite He imposed on all His followers), . . . Don't they realize that Christianity arose in the Mediterranean world where, then as now, wine was as much part of the normal diet as bread? --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _Letters of C.S. Lewis_ [1966], "16 March 1955"

Our passions are not too strong, they are too weak. We are far too easily pleased. - C S Lewis

We are not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be. - C S Lewis

We don't pray to change God. We pray to change ourselves. --C S Lewis., 'The Pilgrim's Regress'

Atheists express their rage against God although in their view He does not exist. --C. S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain

In God you come up against something which is in every way immeasurably superior to yourself...As long as you are proud you cannot know God. --C. S. Lewis, _Mere Christianity_, Chapter 8, The Great Sin

When you are arguing against Him you are arguing against the very power that makes you able to argue at all. ~C.S.Lewis, Mere Christianity.

The process of living seems to consist in coming to realize truths so ancient and simple that, if stated, they sound like barren platitudes. They cannot sound otherwise to those who have not had the relevant experience: that is why there is no real teaching of such truths possible and every generation starts from scratch. C S Lewis - Letters, May 1939

The settled happiness and security which we all desire, God withholds from us by the very nature of the world; but joy, pleasure, and merriment, He has scattered broadcast. We are never safe, but we have plenty of fun, and some ecstasy. It is not hard to see why. The security we crave would teach us to rest our hearts in this world and oppose an obstacle to our return to God: a few moments of happy love, a landscape, a symphony, a merry meeting with our friends, a bathe or a football match, have no such tendency. Our Father refreshes us on the journey with some pleasant inns, but will not encourage us to mistake them for home. C S Lewis ( The Problem of Pain)

Never forget that when we are dealing with any pleasure ints healthy and normal and satisfying form, we are, in asense, on the Enemy's ground. I know we have won many a soulthrough pleasure. All the same, it is His invention, not ours. He made the pleasures: all our research so far has not enabled us to produce one. All we can do is to encourage the humans to take the pleasures which our Enemy has produced, at times, or in ways, or in degrees, which He has forbidden. Hence we always try to work away from the natural condition of any pleasure to that in which it is least natural, least redolent of its Maker, and least pleasurable. An ever increasing craving for an ever diminishing pleasure is the formula. It is more certain; and it's better style. To getthe man's soul and give him nothing in return--that is what really gladdens our Father's heart.--C. S. Lewis, _The Screwtape Letters_

One reason why people find [Life-Force religion] so attractive is itgives one much of the emotional comfort of believing in God and none of the less pleasant consequences. When you are feeling fit and the sun is shining and you do not want to believe that the whole universe is a mere mechanical dance of atoms, it is nice to be able to think of this great mysterious Force rolling on through the centuries and carrying you on its crest. If, on the other hand, you want to do something rather shabby, the Life-Force, being only a blind force, with no morals and no mind, will never interfere with you like that troublesome God we learned about when we were children. The Life- Force is a sort of tame God. You can switch it on when you want, but it will not bother you. All the thrills of religion and none of the cost. Is the Life-Force the greatest achievement of wishful thinking the world has yet seen? ~C.S. Lewis, "Mere Christianity".

The basic principle of the new education is to be that dunces and idlers must not be made to feel inferior to intelligent and industrious pupils. That would be "undemocratic." These differences between pupils &endash; for they are obviously and nakedly individual differences &endash; must be disguised. This can be done at various levels. At universities, examinations must be framed so that nearly all the students get good marks. Entrance examinations must be framed so that all, or nearly all, citizens can go to universities, whether they have any power (or wish) to profit by higher education or not. At schools, the children who are too stupid or lazy to learn languages and mathematics and elementary science can be set to doing things that children used to do in their spare time. Let, them, for example, make mud pies and call it modeling. But all the time there must be no faintest hint that they are inferior to the children who are at work. Whatever nonsense they are engaged in must have &endash; I believe the English already use the phrase &endash; "parity of esteem." An even more drastic scheme is now possible. Children who are fit to proceed to a higher class may be artificially kept back, because the others would get a trauma -- Beelzebub, what a useful word! &endash; by being left behind. The bright pupil thus remains democratically fettered to his own age group throughout his school career, and a boy who would be capable of tackling Aeschylus or Dante sits listening to his coeval's attempts to spell out A CAT SAT ON A MAT. --C.S. Lewis, Screwtape Proposes A Toast (1959)

No man knows how bad he is until he has tried to be good. There is a silly idea about that good people don't know what temptation means. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _The Screwtape Letters_ [1941]

What in heaven's name is the idea of everyone sending everyone else pictures of stage-coaches, fairies, foxes, dogs, butterflies, kittens, flowers, etc.?... Imagine a Chinese man sitting at a table covered with small pictures. The man explains that he is preparing for the anniversary of Buddha's being protected by the dragons. Not that he personally believes that this is the real anniversary of the event or even that it really happened. He is just keeping up the old custom. Not that he has any pictures of Buddha or of the dragons. He doesn't like that kind. He says, "Here's one of a traction engine for Hu Flung Dung, and I'm sending this study of a napkin-ring to Lo Hung Git, and these jolly ones of bluebottles are for the children. ~C.S. Lewis, letter to his brother Warren (Christmas Eve 1939) -on the futility of celebrating the Nativity if one does not accept the Incarnation.

I believe a man is happier, and happy in a richer way, if he has "the freeborn mind." But I doubt whether he can have this without economic independence, which the new society is abolishing. For economic independence allows an education not controlled by Government; and in adult life it is the man who needs, and asks, nothing of Government who can criticise its acts and snap his fingers at its ideology. Read Montaigne; that's the voice of a man with his legs under his own table, eating the mutton and turnips raised on his own land. Who will talk like that when the State is everyone's schoolmaster and employer? -- C.S. Lewis

Anxiety is not only a pain which we must ask God to assuage but also a weakness we must ask Him to pardon &emdash; for He's told us to take no care for the morrow. - C. S.Lewis, letter ,NOVEMBER 27, 1953,

We have now for many centuries triumphed over nature to the extent of making certain secondary characteristics of the male (such as the beard) disagreeable to nearly all the females--and there is more in that than you might suppose. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _The Screwtape Letters_ [1942], "Letter 20"

One needs the sweetness to start one on the spiritual life but, once started, one must learn to obey God for his own sake, not for the pleasure. -- C. S. Lewis, Letter of 11/9/1931

 I do not believe that God created an egalitarian world. I believe the authority of parent over child, husband ever wife, learned over simple, to have been as much a part of the original plan as the authority of man over beast. I believe that if we had not fallen Filmer would be right, and patriarchal monarchy would be the sole lawful government. C. S. Lewis "Membership" Sobernost #31 (June 1945)

..there are two opposite reasons for being a democrat. You may think all men so good that they deserve a share in the government of the commonwealth, and so wise that the commonwealth needs their advice. That is, in my opinion, the false, romantic doctrine of democracy. On the other hand, you may believe fallen men to be so wicked that not one of them can be trusted with any irresponsible power over his fellows. ----C. S. Lewis "Membership" Sobernost #31 (June 1945)

What can you ever really know of other people's souls-- of their temptations, their opportunities, their struggles? One soul in the whole creation you do know: and it is the only one whose fate is placed in your hands. --C. S. Lewis, _Mere Christianity_, Chapter 10

I walk in wonders beyond myself. --C. S. Lewis

Power worship blurs political judgement because it leads, almost unavoidably to the belThe vice I am talking about is Pride or Self-Conceit: and the virtue opposite to it, in Christian morals, is called Humility. You may remember, when I was talking about sexual morality, I warned you that the centre of Christian morals did not lie there. Well, now we have come to the centre. According to Christian teachers, the essential vice, the utmost evil, is Pride. Unchastity, greed, drunkenness, and all that, are mere flea-bites in comparison: it was through Pride that the devil became the devil: Pride leads to every other vice: it is the complete anti-God state of mind. ... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963)

To be happy at home, said Johnson, is the end of all human endeavour. As long as we are thinking only of natural values we must say that the sun looks down on nothing half so good as a household laughing together over a meal, or two friends talking over a pint of beer, or a man alone reading a book that interests him; and that all economics, politics, laws, armies, and institutions, save in so far as they prolong and multiply such scenes, are a mere ploughing the sand and sowing the ocean, a meaningless vanity and vexation of spirit. ... But do not let us mistake necessary evils for good. The mistake is easily made. Fruit has to be tinned if it is to be transported, and has to lose thereby some of its good qualities. But one meets people who have learned actually to prefer the tinned fruit to the fresh. A sick society must think much about politics, as a sick man must think much about his digestion: to ignore the subject may be fatal cowardice for the one as for the other. But if either comes to regard it as the natural food of the mind - if either forgets that we think of such things only in order to be able to think of something else - then what was undertaken for the sake of health has become itself a new and deadly disease.--C. S. Lewis "Membership" Sobernost #31 (June 1945)

The long dull monotonous years of middle-aged prosperity or middle-aged adversity are excellent campaigning weather for the Devil.
C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) "The Screwtape Letters," 1941

Amiable agnostics will talk cheerfully about man's search for God. For me, they might as well talk about the mouse's search for a cat... C. S. LEWIS

It is only our bad temper that we put down to being tired or worried or hungry; we put our good temper down to ourselves.
C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) "Mere Christianity."

Man has held three views of his body. First there is that of those ascetic Pagans who called it the prison or the "tomb" of the soul, and of Christians like Fisher to whom it was a "sack of dung", food for worms, filthy, shameful, a source of nothing but temptation to bad men and humiliation to good ones. Then there are the Neo-Pagans (they seldom know Greek), the nudist and the sufferers from Dark Gods, to whom the body is glorious. But thirdly we have the view which St. Francis expressed by calling his body, "Brother Ass". All three may be---I am not sure--defensible; but give me St. Francis for my money. "Ass" is exquisitely right because no one in his senses can either rever or hate a donkey. It is a useful, sturdy, lazy, obstinate, patient, lovable and infuriating beast; deserving now the stick and now a carrot; both pathetically and absurdly beautiful. So the body. There's no living with it till we recognise that one of its functions in our lives is to play the part of buffoon. Until some theory has sophisticated them, every man, woman and child in the world knows this. The fact that we have bodies is the oldest joke there is....The highest does not stand without the lowest. There is indeed at certain moments a high poetry in the flesh itself; but also, by your leave, an irreducible element of obstinate and ludicrous unpoetry. If it does not make itself felt on one occasion, it will on another. Far better to plant it foresquare within the drama of Eros as comic relief than pretend you haven't noticed it.
C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves

Look for yourself and you will find in the long run only hatred, loneliness, despair, rage, ruin and decay. But look for Christ and you will find Him, and with Him everything else thrown in.-- C. S. LEWIS

Among the Jews there suddenly turns up a man who goes about talking as if He as God...Now let us get this clear. Among Pantheists, like the Indians, anyone might say that he was part of God, or one with God:There would be nothing very odd about it. But this man, since He was a Jew, could not mean that kind of God. God, in their language, meant the Being outsidethe world Who made it and was infinitely different from anything else. Andwhen you have grasped that, you will see that what this man said was, quite simply, the most shocking thing that has ever been uttered by human lips. C. S. Lewis

I believe in Christianity as I believe that the Sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), "Is Theology Poetry?"

Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important. CS Lewis

Among the oxen (like an ox I'm slow)
I see a glory in the stable grow
Which, with the ox's dullness might at length
Give me an ox's strength.

Among the asses (stubborn I as they)
I see my Saviour where I looked for hay;
So may my beast like folly learn at least
The patience of a beast.

Among the sheep (I like a sheep have strayed)
I watch the manger where my Lord is laid;
Oh that my baa-ing nature would win thence
Some woolly innocence!
CS Lewis The Nativity

Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point, which means at the point of highest reality. A chastity or honesty or mercy which yields to danger will be chaste or honest or merciful only on conditions. Pilate was merciful until it became risky.
C.S. Lewis (1898-1963), The Screwtape Letters

If we really think that home is elsewhere and that this life is a 'wandering to find home,' why should we not look forward to the arrival?
C.S. Lewis letter:7 June 1959

Has this world been so kind to you that you should leave with regret? There are better things ahead than any we leave behind.
C.S. Lewis (1898-1963)

God cannot give us a happiness and peace apart from Himself, because it is not there. There is no such thing.
C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) Mere Christianity

Our Father refreshes us on the journey with some pleasant inns, but will not encourage us to mistake them for home.
C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) The Problem of Pain

The safest road to Hell is the gradual one--the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts. C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) The Screwtape Letters

"You come of the Lord Adam and the Lady Eve," said Aslan. "And that is both honour enough to erect the head of the poorest beggar, and shame enough to bow the shoulders of the greatest emperor in earth. Be content." C S Lewis Prince Caspian

Joy is never in our power and pleasure often is. C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) Surprised by Joy

There are two kinds of people: those who say to God, "Thy will be done," and those to whom God says, "All right, then, have it your way." C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) The Great Divorce

He that but looketh on a plate of ham and eggs to lust after it hath already committed breakfast with it in his heart. C S Lewis Letters to an American Lady

God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks to us in our conscience, but shouts in our pains: It is His megaphone to rouse a deaf world. -- C S Lewis - The Problem of Pain

The moment you wake up each morning, all your wishes and hopes for the day rush at you like wild animals. And the first job each morning consists in shoving it all back; in listening to that other voice, taking that other point of view, letting that other, larger, stronger, quieter life coming flowing in. C.S. Lewis (1898-1963)

Can a mortal ask question which God finds unanswerable? Quite easily, I should think. All nonsense questions are unanswerable. How many hours are there in a mile? Is yellow square or round? Probably half the questions we ask---half our great theological and metaphysical problems---are like that. And now that I come to think of it, there's no practical problem before me at all. I know the two great commandments, and I'd better get on with them. C. S. Lewis A Grief Observed

Has this world been so kind to you that you should leave with regret? There are better things ahead than any we leave behind. C.S. Lewis (1898-1963)

No man knows how bad he is until he has tried to be good. There is a silly idea about that good people don't know what temptation means. -- C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) The Screwtape Letters

The great thing, if one can, is to stop regarding all the unpleasant things as interruptions of one's 'own,' or 'real' life. The truth is of course that what one calls the interruptions are precisely one's real life--the the life God is sending one day by day: what one calls one's 'real life' is a phantom of one's own imagination. This at least is what I see at moments of insight: but it's hard to remember it all the time. C.S. Lewis, The Letters of C.S. Lewis to Arthur Greeves

The next best thing to being wise oneself is to live in a circle of those who are --C.S. Lewis, Selected Literary Essays

When we lose one blessing, another is often most unexpectedly given in its place.--C.S. Lewis , letter: 3 Aug 1959

An open mind, in questions that are not ultimate, is useful. But an open mind about the ultimate foundations either of Theoretical or of Practical Reason is idiocy.--C.S. Lewis The Abolition of Man

If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.
C S Lewis--Mere Christianity

An open mind, in questions that are not ultimate, is useful. But an open mind about the ultimate foundations either of Theoretical or of Practical Reason is idiocy.--C.S. Lewis The Abolition of Man

If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.
C S Lewis--Mere Christianity

Without the aid of trained emotions the intellect is powerless against the animal organism.--C.S. Lewis The Abolition of Man

This year, or this month, or, more likely, this very day, we have failed to practise ourselves the kind of behaviour we expect from other people.
C.S. Lewis The Case for Christianity

All men alike stand condemned, not by alien codes of ethics, but by their own, and all men therefore are conscious of guilt.-- C S Lewis --The Problem of Pain

If the universe is so bad...how on earth did human beings ever come to attribute it to the activity of a wise and good Creator? C.S. Lewis--The Problem of Pain

[God] is not proud...He will have us even though we have shown that we prefer everything else to Him. C.S. Lewis --The Problem of Pain

If God thinks this state of war in the universe a price worth paying for free will...then we may take it it is worth paying.-- C S Lewis--Mere Christianity

Sin is the dare of God's justice, the rape of His mercy, the jeer of His patience, the slight of His power, and the contempt of His love.-- John Bunyan

All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.-- H.L. Mencken

Without the aid of trained emotions the intellect is powerless against the animal organism.--C.S. Lewis The Abolition of Man

This year, or this month, or, more likely, this very day, we have failed to practise ourselves the kind of behaviour we expect from other people.
C.S. Lewis The Case for Christianity

All men alike stand condemned, not by alien codes of ethics, but by their own, and all men therefore are conscious of guilt.-- C S Lewis --The Problem of Pain

If the universe is so bad...how on earth did human beings ever come to attribute it to the activity of a wise and good Creator? C.S. Lewis--The Problem of Pain

[God] is not proud...He will have us even though we have shown that we prefer everything else to Him. C.S. Lewis --The Problem of Pain

If God thinks this state of war in the universe a price worth paying for free will...then we may take it it is worth paying.-- C S Lewis--Mere Christianity

Reality, in fact, is always something you couldn't have guessed. That's one of the reasons I believe Christianity. It's a religion you couldn't have guessed. -- C.S. Lewis--The Case for Christianity

'Safe?' said Mr. Beaver...'Who said anything about safe? 'Course he isn't safe. but he's good. He's the King, I tell you.'
C S Lewis--The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Confronted with a cancer or a slum the Pantheist can say, "If you could only see it from the divine point of view, you would realize that this also is God." The Christian replies, "Don't talk damned nonsense." --C. S. Lewis, _The Case for Christianity_, 1943

[Pain] removes the veil; it plants the flag of truth within the fortress of a rebel soul. -- C.S. Lewis --The Problem of Pain

What makes some theological works like sawdust to me is the way the authors can go on discussing how far certain positions are adjustable to contemporary thought, or beneficial in relation to social problems, or "have a future" before them, but never squarely ask what grounds we have for supposing them to be true accounts of any objective reality. As if we were trying to make rather than to learn. Have we no Other to reckon with?... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963)

All [Christian churches] regard divorce as something like cutting up a living body, as a kind of surgical operation. Some of them think the operation so violent that it cannot be done at all; others admit it as a desperate remedy in extreme cases. They are all agreed that it is more like having both your legs cut off than it is like dissolving a business partnership or even deserting a regiment. What they all disagree with is the modern view that it is a simple readjustment of partners, to be made whenever people feel they are no longer in love with one another, or when either of them falls in love with someone else.
C S Lewis-- _Mere Christianity_

Now Faith...is the art of holding on to things your reason 'has once accepted, in spite of your changing moods. For moods will change, whatever view your reason takes. I know that by experience. Now that I am a Christian I do have moods in which the whole thing looks very improbable: but when I was an atheist I had moods in which Christianity looked terribly probable. This rebellion of your moods against your real self is going to come anyway. That is why Faith is such a necessary virtue: unless you teach your moods "where they get off," you can never be either a sound Christian or even a sound atheist, but just a creature dithering to and fro, with its beliefs really dependent on the weather and the state of its digestion. Consequently one must train the habit of Faith.
C S Lewis -- _Mere Christianity_

An "impersonal God"-- well and good. A subjective God of beauty, truth and goodness, inside our own heads -- better still. A formless life-force surging through us, a vast power which we can tap -- best of all. But God Himself, alive, pulling at the other end of the cord, perhaps, approaching an infinite speed, the hunter, king, husband -- that is quite another matter. There comes a moment when the children who have been playing at burglars hush suddenly: was that a real footstep in the hall? There comes a moment when people who have been dabbling in religion ("Man's search for God!") suddenly draw back. Supposing we really found Him? We never meant it to come to that! Worse still, supposing He had found us?
C. S. Lewis, "Miracles" (New York: Macmillan, 1960), p.94

No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally (and often far more) worth reading at the age of fifty and beyond.
LEWIS, CLIVE STAPLES (1898-1963)

Part of every misery is, so to speak, the misery's shadow or reflection: the fact that you don't merely suffer but have to keep on thinking about the fact that you suffer. I not only live each endless day in grief, but live each day thinking about living each day in grief. C S Lewis

We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be. -- C.S. Lewis, "Letters of C.S. Lewis", 29 April, 1959, para. 1, pg. 285.

I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks".. C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) Letters to Malcom: Chiefly on Prayer (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1964 , pp. 4-5.

The [Christian] "doctrines" are translations into our concepts and ideas of that which God has already expressed inlanguage more adequate, namely the actual incarnation, crucifixion, and resurrection.... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), letter

We must sometimes get away from the Authorized Version, if for no other reason, simply because it is so beautiful and so solemn. Beauty exalts, but beauty also lulls. Early associations endear, but they also confuse. Through that beautiful solemnity, the transporting or horrifying realities of which the Book tells may come to us blunted and disarmed, and we may only sigh with tranquil veneration when we ought to be burning with shame, or struck dumb with terror, or carried out of ourselves by ravishing hopes and adorations. ... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), God in the Dock

[Milton's] argument is (a) St. Augustine was wrong in thinking God's only purpose in giving Adam a female, instead of a male, companion, was copulation. For (b) there is a "peculiar comfort" in the society of man and woman "beside, (i.e. in addition to, apart from) the genial bed"; and (c) we know from Scripture that something analogous to "play" or "slackening the cords" occurs even in God. That is why the Song of Songs describes a thousand raptures...far on the hither side of carnal enjoyment. --C. S. Lewis, _Preface to Paradise Lost_,

I see only one thing to do at the moment. Your patient has become humble; have you drawn his attention to the fact? All virtues are less formidable to us once the man is aware that he has them, but this is specially true of humility. Catch him at the moment when he is really poor in spirit and smuggle into his mind the gratifying reflection, "By jove! I'm being humble", and almost immediately pride at his own humility will appear.--C. S. Lewis, _The Screwtape Letters_

It may be hard for an egg to turn into a bird: it would be a jolly sight harder for it to learn to fly while remaining an egg. We are like eggs at present. And you cannot go on indefinitely being just an ordinary, decent egg. We must be hatched or go bad. -- C.S. Lewis

If war is ever lawful, then peace is sometimes sinful.--C.S. Lewis

The very strength and facility of the pessimists' case at once poses us a problem. If the universe is so bad, or even half so bad, how on earth did human beings ever come to attribute it to the activity of a wise and good Creator? Men are fools, perhaps; but hardly so foolish as that. The direct inference from black to white, from evil flower to virtuous root, from senseless work to a workman infinitely wise, staggers belief. The spectacle of the universe as revealed by experience can never have been the ground of religion: it must have always been something in spite of which religion, acquired from a different source, was held.... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), The Problem of Pain

There is one vice of which no man in the world is free; which every one in the world loathes when he sees it in someone else; and of which hardly any people, except Christians ever imagine that they are guilty themselves....The essential vice, the utmost evil, is Pride. Unchastity, anger, greed, drunkenness, and all that, are mere fleabites in comparison: it was through Pride that the devil became the devil; Pride leads to every other vice: it is the complete anti-God state of mind...As long as you are proud you cannot know God. A proud man is always looking down on things and people; and, of course, as long as you are looking down, you cannot see something that is above you...~ C.S Lewis, Mere Christianity

When I have learnt to love God better than my earthly dearest, I shall love my earthly dearest better than I do now.... When first things are put first, second things are not suppressed but increased. - C.S. Lewis , letter: 8 Nov 1952

My argument against God was that the universe seemed so cruel and unjust. But how had I got this idea of just and unjust? A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line. What was I comparing this universe with when I called it unjust? If the whole show was bad and senseless from A to Z, so to speak, why did I, who was supposed to be part of the show, find myself in such violent reaction against it? A man feels wet when he falls into water, because man is not a water animal: a fish would not feel wet. Of course, I could have given up my idea of justice by saying that it was nothing but a private idea of my own. But if I did that, then my argument against God collapsed too--for the argument depended on saying that the world was really unjust, not simply that it did not happen to please my private fancies. Thus in the very act of trying to prove that God did not exist--in other words, that the whole of reality was senseless--I found I was forced to assume that one part of reality--namely my idea of justice--was full of sense. Consequently atheism turns out to be too simple. If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning: just as, if there were no light in the universe and therefore no creatures with eyes, we should never know it was dark. Dark would be without meaning.--C.S. Lewis _Mere Christianity_

We keep on assuming that we know the play. We do not even know whether we are in Act I or Act V. We do not know who are the major and who the minor characters. The Author knows. _The World's Last Night_, C. S. Lewis

I didn't go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don't recommend Christianity. -- C. S. Lewis

Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up save in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket--safe, dark, motionless, airless--it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable. C.S. Lewis

I think we all sin by needlessly disobeying the apostolic injunction to "rejoice" as much as by anything else. -- C. S. Lewis, _The Problem of Pain_, 1944

Gambling ought never to be an important part of a man's life. If it is a way in which large sums of money are transferred from person to person without doing any good (e.g., producing employment, goodwill, etc.) then it is a bad thing. If it is carried out on a small scale, I am not sure that it is bad. I don't know much about it, becauseit is about the only vice to which I have no temptation at all, and I think it is a risk to talk about things which are not in my own make-up, because I don't understand them. If anyone comes to me asking to play bridge for money, I just say: "How much do you hope to win? Take it and go away." --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _God in the Dock_ [1948], "Answers to Questions on Christianity," Question 13

In most parts of the Bible, everything is implicitly or explicitly introduced with "Thus saith the Lord". It is... not merely a sacred book but a book so remorselessly and continuously sacred that it does not invite -- it excludes or repels -- the merely aesthetic approach. You can read it as literature only by a tour de force... It demands incessantly to be taken on its own terms: it will not continue to give literary delight very long, except to those who go to it for something quite different. I predict that it will in the future be read, as it always has been read, almost exclusively by Christians. ... C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), They Asked for a Paper

Never, never pin your whole faith on any human being: not if he is the best and wisest in the whole world. There are lots of nice things you can do with sand; but do not try building a house on it. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _Mere Christianity_ [1952], Book 4, Chapter 7

I am delighted to hear that you have taken to Johnson. Yes, isn't it a magnificent style--the very essence of manliness and condensation. . . . I personally get more pleasure from the Rambler than from anything else of his and at one time I used to read a Rambler every evening as a nightcap. --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _The Letters of C. S. Lewis to Arthur Greeves_ [1986], "22 June 1930"

Your Hindus certainly sound delightful. But what do they deny? That's always been my trouble with Indians--to find any proposition they would pronounce false. But truth must surely involve exclusions? --Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) _Letters of C.S. Lewis_ [1966], "8 February 1956" (In a letter to Dom Bede Griffiths, O.S.B. who was in India at the time.)

Joe E Lewis

I went on a diet, swore off drinking and heavy eating, and in fourteen days I lost two weeks. -- Joe E Lewis

Paul Lewis

Remember, your basic assignment as a parent is to work yourself out of a job. --Paul Lewis

Richard Lewis

My grandmother was a Jewish juggler: she used to worry about six things at once. Richard Lewis

Sinclair Lewis

Advertising is a valuable economic factor because it is the cheapest way of selling goods, especially if the goods are worthless. ~Sinclair Lewis

Leona Marhsall Libby

Dean Acheson took Oppenheimer into the Oval Office and introduced him to Truman. Oppenheimer said, 'I have blood on my hands.' Truman claims that he responded to Oppenheimer by saying, 'Never mind, it will all come out in the wash.' Then Truman cut short the interview... Acheson was called back into Truman's presence... Truman shouted 'Never bring that idiot here again.' - Leona Marhsall Libby _The Uranium

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1742 &endash; 1799)

The highest point to which a weak but experienced mind can rise is detecting the weakness of better men. -- Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, _Aphorisms_, late 18thC

With most people unbelief in one thing is founded upon blind belief in another. G. C. Lichtenberg

A person reveals his character by nothing so clearly as the joke he resents. G. C. Lichtenberg

I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go. My own wisdom and that of all about me seemed insufficient for that day. --ascribed to Lincoln after his death by a reporter named Noah Brooks ("Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln," Harper's 31 (July 1865), 226.)

Eric Liddell

Jenny, God has made me for a purpose - for China; but he has also made me fast, and when I run, I feel his pleasure.
ERIC LIDDELL, Chariots of Fire

B. H. Liddell Hart

Helplessness induces hopelessness, and history attests that loss of hope and not loss of lives is what decides the issue of war. B. H. Liddell Hart

Henry P Liddon

Nothing is really lost by a life of sacrifice; everything is lost by failure to obey God's call. --Henry P Liddon

Joshua L. Liebman

Maturity is achieved when a person accepts life as full of tension. -Joshua L. Liebman

Robert J. Lightner

The sincere student of Scripture cannot avoid the truth of God's choice of individuals from among the sinful race of men. We may not understand this, but we must never deny it. Scripture is filled with this great truth: it is not an isolated doctrine of the Word.... Robert J. Lightner

The doctrine of the blessed Trinity is a reminder of the supernaturalness of biblical Christianity. The doctrine defies rationalization, yet it provides for the believer the answer to the unity and diversity of the world.... Robert P. Lightner (1931- )

James Lileks

This story has irritated me from the start, and it has nothing to do with Rev. Robinson's sexual orientation. The guy left his wife and kids to go do the hokey-pokey with someone else: that's what it's all about, at least for me. Marriages founder for a variety of reasons, and ofttimes they're valid reasons, sad and inescapable. But "I want to have sex with other people" is not a valid reason for depriving two little girls of a daddy who lives with them, gets up at night when they're sick, kisses them in the morning when they wake. There's a word for people who leave their children because they don't want to have sex with Mommy anymore: selfish. I'm not a praying man, but I cannot possibly imagine asking God if that would be okay. -- James Lileks, http://www.lileks.com/bleats/archive/03/0803/080703.html

Heard an interview with Rev. Robinson this afternoon, and he used a phrase that set my teeth on edge: he referred to partnerships as "life-intentioned." A wonderful weasel word, that: intention. The escape hatch is built right in. It's as if the intention to stay together is equal to the expressed promise to stay together. But it's not. Everyone had a faithless lover who did you wrong, and usually blamed everything but free will. It just happened, you know. Wasn't intending to cheat, but . . . it just happened, okay? Tonight I told my wife that I now regarded our marriage vows not as a solemn promise, but an expression of my intentions. Ever seen those "Bringing Up Father" cartoons where Jiggs flees the house, trailed by a fusillade of rolling pins and frying pans? -- James Lileks, http://www.lileks.com/bleats/archive/03/0803/080703.html

Who are you to judge? is the standard response, and I quote Captain James T. Kirk when asked the same question by Kodos the Executioner: who do I have to be? -- James Lileks, http://www.lileks.com/bleats/archive/03/0803/080703.html

Rush Limbaugh (1951 &endash; )

"If Thomas Jefferson thought taxation without representation was bad, he should see how it is with representation." Rush Limbaugh (1951 &endash; ) People_:

Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906 - 2001)

For happiness one needs security, but joy can spring like a flower even from the cliffs of despair.-- Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Only love can be divided endlessly and still not diminish. - Anne Morrow Lindbergh, 1906 - 2001

The intellectual is constantly betrayed by his own vanity. Godlike, he blandly assumes that he can express everything in words. --Anne Morrow Lindbergh _The Wave of the Future_ [1940]

Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

Character is like a tree and reputation like its shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.
Lincoln, Abraham (1809-1865) in Gross _Lincoln's Own Stories_ (1912) p. 109

Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces, but let us judge not, that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered. That of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has His own purposes. "Woe unto the world because of offenses; for it must needs be that offenses come, but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh." If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him? Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said "the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether." With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations. --Abraham Lincoln, Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1865

I know that the LORD is always on the side of the right. But it is my constant anxiety and prayer that I and this nation should be on the LORD'S side. -- Lincoln, reply to a clergyman who said to Lincoln that he hoped "the Lord was on our side, Francis B. Carpenter, _Six Months at the White House with Abraham Lincoln_, p. 282 (1867).

My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with your failure. - Abraham Lincoln, 1809 - 1865

Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. -- Abraham Lincoln

How many legs does a dog have if you call the tail a leg? Four. Calling a tail a leg doesn't make it a leg. -- Abraham Lincoln

A governor of a certain state was visiting the state prison, and stopped to talk with a number of prisoners. They told him their story, and in every instance it was one of wrong suffered by an innocent person. There was one man, however, who admitted his crime and the justice of his sentence. "I must pardon you," said the governor; "I can't have you in here corrupting all these good men." --Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) _Lincoln's Wit_ [1958],

Prohibition will work great injury to the cause of temperance. It is a species of intemperance within itself, for it goes beyond the bounds of reason, in that it attempts to control a mans appetite by legislation and makes a crime out of things that are not crimes.- attr to Abraham Lincoln, but most probably not his, though a true observation IMO.

I were two-faced, would I be wearing this one? Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

He can compress the most words into the smallest idea of any man I know. Abraham Lincoln

I am a slow walker, but I never walk backwards. Abraham Lincoln

I have been driven many times to my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had absolutely no other place to go. -- Abraham Lincoln

Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.-- Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

Military glory--that attractive rainbow thatrises in showers of blood. --Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.
Abraham Lincoln (also attr. Confucius)

The probability that we may fail in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just. - Abraham Lincoln

Nations like individuals are subjected to punishments and chastisements in this world.~Abraham Lincoln, Proclamation ( March 30 1863)

Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be. Abraham Lincoln

It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him a sentence to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words: "And this, too, shall pass away." How much it expresses! How chastening in the hour of pride! How consoling in the depths of affliction! ~ Abraham Lincoln

Mary Todd Lincoln (1818-1882)

Beautiful, glorious Scotland, has spoilt me for every other country! Mary Todd Lincoln (1818-1882) : Letter, 21 Aug 1869; in "The Mary Lincoln Letters," 1956.

Art Linkletter (1912-____)

If you don't go far enough back in memory or far enough ahead in hope, your future will be impoverished.
Art Linkletter (1912-____)

It requires wisdom to understand wisdom. The music is nothing if the audience is deaf. --Walter Lippmann (1889-1974) _A Preface to Morals_

Walter Lippmann

..the Bill of Rights does not come from the people and is not subject to change by majorities. It comes from the nature of things. It declares the inalienable rights of man not only against all government but also against the people collectively. -- Walter Lippmann

Love endures only when the lovers love many things together and not merely each other. Walter Lippman (09/23/1889 &endash; 12/14/1974)

Free institutions are not the property of any majority. They do not confer upon majorities unlimited powers. The rights of the majority are limited rights. They are limited not only by the constitutional guarantees but by the moral principle implied in those guarantees. That principle is that men may not use the facilities of liberty to impair them. No man may invoke a right in order to destroy it.-- Walter Lippmann

It requires wisdom to understand wisdom. The music is nothing if the audience is deaf. --Walter Lippmann (1889-1974) _A Preface to Morals_

David Livingstone (1813-73)

I will go anywhere, provided it is forward. David Livingstone

Livy [Titus Livius]

Men are slower to recognize blessings than evils.--Livy [Titus Livius] (59 BC-17 AD)_Ab Urbe Condita_ [c. 29 BC]

Richard Llewellyn

But the great Dr. Johnson was one in a century, and I count myself honored to have tasted the wine of his speech, even though put to my mouth through the goodness of his friend. For that Englishman is not to be read with the eyes alone, but read out, as with the Word, with a good voice, and a rolling of the tongue, so that the rich taste of magnificent English may come to the ears and go to the head, like the perfumes of the Magi, or like the best of beer, home brewed and long in the cask.--Richard Llewellyn, _How Green Was My Valley_ (1940), ch. 27

David Lloyd George

I tell you, as one who has studied the whole situation, I don't think Hitler is a fool--he is not going to challenge the British Empire.-David Lloyd George, speech, 1937

We are fighting Germany, Austria and Drink, and as far as I can see, the greatest of these deadly foes is Drink. - David LLoyd George, The Times, 30 Mar 1915

When they circumcised him they threw away the wrong bit.-- David Lloyd George on his Liberal Party colleague Sir Herbert Samuel

Poor Bonar can't bear being called a liar. Now, I don't mind.--David Lloyd George, letter, 22 October 1923, on the new Prime Minister, Andrew Bonar Law. Presumably one thought he was not a liar while the other knew it was fair comment.

D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

If the preaching of the gospel is not practical, it is not true preaching. - D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

John Locke

If God has taken away all means of seeking remedy, there is nothing left but patience.-- John Locke

Reading furnishes the mind only with materials for knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours. -- John Locke

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common. -- John Locke

Fortitude I take to be the quiet possession of a man's self, and an undisturbed doing his duty whatever evils beset, or dangers lie in the way. In itself an essential virtue, it is a guard to every other virtue.-- John Locke

John Gibson Lockhart

[Melancholy] falls upon a contented life, like a drop of ink on white paper, which is none the less a stain that it carries no meaning with it. John Gibson Lockhart

Lee Loevinger

Television is a golden goose that lays scrambled eggs; and it is futile and probably fatal to beat it for not laying caviar. Anyway more people like scrambled eggs than caviar. Lee Loevinger

Vince Lombardi

I firmly believe that any man's finest hour - his greatest fulfillment to all he holds dear - is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle -- victorious.--Vince Lombardi

It's not whether you get knocked down, it's whether you get up.-   Lombardi, Vince  

The spirit, the will to win, and the will to excel are the things that endure. These qualities are so much more important than the events that occur.    - Vincent Thomas Lombardi, 1913 - 1970

Jack London (1876 &endash; 1916)

I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather that my spark burn out in a brilliant blaze than it be stifled by dry-rot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. -- Jack London, 1916

Henry W. Longfellow. 1807-1882.

The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
And all the sweet of books.
Henry W. Longfellow. 1807-1882. Morituri Salutamus.

Noble souls, through dust and heat,
Rise from disaster and defeat
The stronger.- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) _Ultima Thule_ [1980], "The Sifting of Peter"

Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.
Henry W. Longfellow. 1807-1882. The Rainy Day

Lives of great men all remind us
We can make our lives sublime,
And departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time.
Longfellow - A Psalm of Life

Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal;
Dust thou art, to dust returnest, Was not spoken of the soul.
Longfellow (1819-1892)

Tell me not, in mournful numbers,
Life is but an empty dream!
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
And things are not what they seem.
Life is real! Life is earnest!
And the grave is not its goal;
Dust though art, to dust returnest,
Was not spoken of the soul.
Longfellow, ' A Psalm of Life'

Look upon the errors of others in sorrow, not in anger.--Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)

Let us be patient! These severe afflictions,
Not from the ground arise;
But oftentimes celestial benedictions,
Assume this dark disguise.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)_Resignation_

Kind hearts are the gardens,
Kind thoughts are the roots,
Kind words are the flowers,
Kind deeds are the fruits,

Take care of your garden
And keep out the weeds,
Fill it with sunshine
Kind words and kind deeds.
Longfellow

In character, in manner, in style, in all things, the supreme excellence is simplicity. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow(1807-1882) In "The Speaker's Electronic Reference Collection," AApex Software, 1994.

Tremper Longman

We breathe culture like we do air, often not even aware of it. We do not question the air we breathe, so culture is often imbibed without reflection. However, there are times we are only too aware of the culture that surrounds us. Indeed, Christians today, evangelicals in particular, are known more as soldiers in the culture wars fighting with legislation and occasional violence than as soldiers of Christ fighting with spiritual weapons.
The general pattern is clear. People generally are unreflective, not rigorous in their contemplation of the forces that work on their minds and hearts. Christians are little different.We breathe the culture until it slaps us in the face and then we give it a quick kick in the groin. Neither response flows from reflection. Critical reflection, however, is fruitful. -- Tremper Longman III, READING THE BIBLE POSTMODERNLY

Perhaps it is being nostalgic for the 1960s, but occasionally I find much more noble existentialism's avowal of meaninglessness followed by despair than postmodernism's embrace of meaninglessness, followed by play, and ideological manipulations of the text. In a word, postmodernism reminds us that while God speaks an infallible authoritative word, our ability to interpret it is not without error. In other words, while the Bible itself comes from "above the sun," interpretation is an "under the sun" activity-- Tremper Longman III, READING THE BIBLE POSTMODERNLY

Leonor F. Loree

This is a helluva way to run a railroad. - Leonor F. Loree

Sophia Loren

Getting ahead in a difficult profession requires avid faith in yourself. That is why some people with mediocre talent, but with great inner drive, go much further thanpeople with vastly superior talent.--Sophia Loren

George Lorimer (1867-1937)

Because a fellow has failed once or twice, or a dozen times, you don't want to set him down as a failure till he's dead or loses his courage - and that's the same thing. -George Lorimer (1867-1937)

You've got to get up every morning with determination if you're going to go to bed with satisfaction. - George Lorimer (1867-1937)

Robert A. Lotzer

Sometimes when I reflect back on all the beer I drink I feel ashamed. Then, I look into the glass and think about the workers in the brewery and all of their hopes and dreams. If I didn't drink this beer, they might be out of work and their dreams would be shattered. Then I say to myself, "It is better that I drink this beer and let their dreams come true than be selfish and worry about my liver.- Robert A. Lotzer

Richard Lovelace

Stone walls do not a prison make,
Nor iron bars a cage;
Minds innocent and quiet take
That for an hermitage
If I have freedom in my love,
And in my soul am free,
Angels alone that soar above
Enjoy such liberty.
Richard Lovelace, from "To Althea, from Prison"

Richard F. Lovelace

The goal of revival is conformity to the image of Christ, not imitation of animals.-- Richard F. Lovelace

The prayer of faith is the instrument which releases the mighty acts of the risen Christ in history.- Richard Lovelace, (Dynamics of Spiritual Life, p. 156)

Louis XVI

Rien. [Nothing.] - The diary of Louis XVI for 14 July 1789 - the day the Bastille was stormed.

I die innocent of all the crimes laid to my charge; I pardon those who have occasioned my death; and I pray to God that the blood you are now going to shed may never bevisited on France; and you, unfortunate people.... - Louis XVI Last Words 21 January 1793

James Russell Lowell. 1819-1891

Mishaps are like knives; they either serve us or cut us, as we grasp them by the blade or the handle.
James Russell Lowell

Whatever else you may be sure of, be sure of this: that you are dreadfully like other people. -- James Russell Lowell, _My Study Windows_, 1871

Joy comes, grief goes, we know not how.
James Russell Lowell. 1819-1891. The Vision of Sir Launfal. Prelude to Part First.

Endurance is the crowning quality,
And patience all the passion of great hearts.
James Russell Lowell. 1819-1891. Columbus.

One thorn of experience is worth a whole wilderness of warning. --James Russell Lowell

New occasions teach new duties, time makes ancient good uncouth,
They must upward still and onward, who would keep abreast of truth.
James Russell Lowell (1934- )

There is no good in arguing with the inevitable. The only argument available with an east wind is to put on your overcoat.-James Russell Lowell

Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556)

As the devil showed great skill in tempting men to perdition., equal skill ought to be shown in saving them. The devil studied the nature of each man, seized upon the traits of his soul, adjusted himself to them and insinuated himself gradually into his victims's confidence -- suggesting splendors to the ambitious, gain to the covetous, delight to the sensuous, and a false appearance of piety to the pious -- and a winner of souls ought to act in the same cautious and skillful way. --Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556)

He who has heard the Word of God can bear his silences.. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556)

Teach us, good Lord, to serve Thee as Thou deservest:
To give and not to count the cost;
To fight and not to heed the wounds;
To toil and not to seek for rest;
To labor and not ask for any reward
Save that of knowing that we do Thy will.
Ignatius of Loyola [1548]

Max Lucado

Our prayers may be awkward. Our attempts may be feeble. But since the power of prayer is in the one who hears it and not in the one who says it, our prayers do make a difference. ~ Max Lucado

Our Savior kneels down and gazes upon the darkest acts of our lives. But rather than recoil in horror, he reaches out in kindness and says, 'I can clean that if you want.' And from the basin of his grace, he scoops a palm full of mercy and washes our sin. --Max Lucado

Faith is the bird that sings while it is yet dark. MAX LUCADO

Lucan [Marcus Annaeus Lucanus] (39-65)

How blind men are to Heaven's gifts!--Lucan [Marcus Annaeus Lucanus] (39-65) _The Civil War_, Book V, Line 528

Dick Lucas

Charismania is pietism gone to seed. -- Dick Lucas

E.V. Lucas

I have noticed that the people who are late are often so much jollier than the people who have to wait for them. E.V. Lucas

W. J. Lucas

It is the wise head that makes the still tongue. --W. J. Lucas

Celia Luce

A small trouble is like a pebble. Hold it too close to your eye and it fills the whole world and puts everything out of focus. Hold it at a proper distance and it can be examined and properly classified. Throw it at your feet and it can be seen in its true setting, just one more tiny bump on the pathway of life. -- Celia Luce

Henry R. Luce (1898 &endash; 1967) 

Show me a man who claims he is objective and I'll show you a man with illusions.- Henry R. Luce (1898 &endash; 1967) 

C F Lummis (1859 - 1928)

I am bigger than anything that can happen to me. All these things, sorrow, misfortune, and suffering, are outside my door. I am in the house and I have the key. -- CHARLES FLETCHER LUMMIS (1859 - 1928)

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

It would be a good thing if young people were wise and old people were strong, but God has arranged things better. MARTIN LUTHER

Whatever your heart clings to and confides in, that is really your God. --Martin Luther (1483-1546) _Large Catechism_ [1529], "The First Commandment"

A religion that gives nothing, costs nothing, and suffers nothing, is worth nothing. --Martin Luther

Faith is a living, daring confidence in God's grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times. - Martin Luther

The Bible is alive, it speaks to me; it has feet, it runs after me; it has hands, it lays hold of me --Martin Luther

In this life, Christ is an example, showing us how to live; in his death, he is a sacrifice, satisfying for our sins; in his resurrection, a conqueror; in his ascentions, a king; in his intercession, a high priest. - Martin Luther, 1483 - 1546

All who call on God in true faith, earnestly from the heart, will certainly be heard, and will receive what they have asked and desired, although not in the hour or in the measure, or the very thing which they ask; yet they will obtain something greater and more glorious than they had dared to ask. ... Martin Luther (1483-1546)

In ourselves, we are sinners, and yet through faith we are righteous by the imputation of God. For we trust him who promises to deliver us, and in the meantime struggle so that sin may not overwhelm us, but that we may stand up to it until he finally take it away from us. MARTIN LUTHER

My Heavenly Father, I thank You, through Jesus Christ, Your beloved Son, that You have protected me, by Your grace. Forgive, I pray, all my sins and the evil I have done. Protect me, by Your grace, tonight. I put myself in your care, body and soul and all that I have. Let Your holy angels be with me, so that the evil enemy will not gain power over me. Amen. MARTIN LUTHER, Evening Prayer

When God works in us, the will, being changed and sweetly breathed upon by the Spirit of God, desire and acts, not from compulsion, but responsively. MARTIN LUTHER

Faith unites the soul with Christ as a bride is united with her bridegroom. As Paul teaches us, Christ and the soul become one flesh by this mystery (Eph 5:31-32). And if they are one flesh, and if marriage is for real - indeed, it is the most perfect of all marriages, and human marriages are poor examples of this one true marriage - then it follows that everything that they have is held in common, whether good or evil. So the believer can boast of and glory of whatever Christ possesses, as though it were his or her own; and whatever the believer has, Christ claims as his own. Let us see how this works out, and see how it benefits us. Christ is full of grace, life and salvation. The human soul is full of sins, eath and damnation. Now let faith come between them. Sins, death and damnation will be Christ's. And grace, life and salvation will be the believer's. MARTIN LUTHER

It is just like someone who is sick, and who believes the doctor who promises his full recovery. In the meantime, he obeys the doctor's orders in the hope of the promised recovery, and abstains from those things which he was told to lay off, so that he may in no way hinder the promised return to health...Now is this sick man well? He is sick in reality - but he is well on account of a sure promise of the doctor, whom he trusts, and who reckons him as already being cured...So he is at one and the same time time both a sinner and righteous. He is a sinner in reality, but righteous by the sure imputation and promise of God that he will continue to deliver him from sin until he has completely cured him. So he is entirely healthy in hope, but a sinner in reality. MARTIN LUTHER,commenting on Romans

When the article of justification has fallen, everything has fallen...This is the chief article from which all other doctrines have flowed...It alone begets, nourishes, builds, preserves, and defnds the church of God; without it the church of God cannot exist for one hour...[it is] the master and prince, the lord, the ruler, and the judge over all kinds of doctrines. MARTIN LUTHER

It is the duty of every Christian to be Christ to his neighbor. MARTIN LUTHER

There is not a word in the Bible which is extra cruem, which can be understood without reference to the cross. MARTIN LUTHER

A Christian man is the most free lord of all, and subject to none; a Christian man is the most dutiful servant of all, and subject to everyone. ~ Martin Luther.

Lord Jesus, you are my righteousness, I am your sin. You have taken upon Yourself what is mine and given me what is yours. You have become what you were not so that I might become what I am not. MARTIN LUTHER

This life therefore is not righteousness but growth in righteousness; not health but healing, not being but becoming, not rest but exercise. We are not what we shall be but we are growing toward it; the process is not yet finished but it is going on; this is not the end but it is the road. All does not yet gleam in glory but all is being purified. MARTIN LUTHER

Faith is not what some people think it is. Their human dream is a delusion. Because they observe that faith is not followed by good works or a better life, they fall into error, even though they speak and hear much about faith. ``Faith is not enough,'' they say, ``You must do good works, you must be pious to be saved.'' They think that, when you hear the gospel, you start working, creating by your own strength a thankful heart which says, ``I believe.'' That is what they think true faith is. But, because this is a human idea, a dream, the heart never learns anything from it, so it does nothing and reform doesn't come from this `faith,' either. Instead, faith is God's work in us, that changes us and gives new birth from God. (John 1:13). It kills the Old Adam and makes us completely different people. It changes our hearts, our spirits, our thoughts and all our powers. It brings the Holy Spirit with it. Yes, it is a living, creative, active and powerful thing, this faith. Faith cannot help doing good works constantly. It doesn't stop to ask if good works ought to be done, but before anyone asks, it already has done them and continues to do them without ceasing. Anyone who does not do good works in this manner is an unbeliever. He stumbles around and looks for faith and good works, even though he does not know what faith or good works are. Yet he gossips and chatters about faith and good works with many words. Faith is a living, bold trust in God's grace, so certain of God's favor that it would risk death a thousand times trusting in it. Such confidence and knowledge of God's grace makes you happy, joyful and bold in your relationship to God and all creatures. The Holy Spirit makes this happen through faith. Because of it, you freely, willingly and joyfully do good to everyone, serve everyone, suffer all kinds of things, love and praise the God who has shown you such grace. Thus, it is just as impossible to separate faith and works as it is to separate heat and light from fire! Therefore, watch out for your own false ideas and guard against good-for-nothing gossips, who think they're smart enough to define faith and works, but really are the greatest of fools. Ask God to work faith in you, or you will remain forever without faith, no matter what you wish, say or can do. MARTIN LUTHER, from "An Introduction to St. Paul's Letter to the Romans

Whatever your heart clings to and confides in, that is really your God. --Martin Luther (1483-1546) _Large Catechism_ [1529], "The First Commandment"

I often laugh at Satan, and there is nothing that makes him so angry as when I attack him to his face, and tell him that through God I am more than a match for him. Martin Luther

In this sort of temptation and struggle, contempt is the best and easiest method of winning over the devil. Laugh your adversary to scorn and ask who it is with whom you are talking. But by all means flee solitude, for the devil watches and lies in wait for you most of all when you are alone. This devil is conquered by mocking and despising him, not by resisting and arguing with him. Therefore, Jerome, joke and play games with your wife and others. In this way you will drive out your diabolical thoughts and take courage Be of good courage, therefore, and cast these dreadful thoughts out of your mind. Whenever the devil pesters you with these thoughts, at once seek out the company of men, drink more, joke and jest, or engage in some other form of merriment. Sometimes it is necessary to drink a little more, play, jest, or even commit some infraction in defiance and contempt of the devil in order not to give him an opportunity to make us scrupulous about trifles. We shall be overcome if we worry too much about falling into some sin. Accordingly if the devil should say, "Do not drink," you should reply to him, "On this very account, because you forbid it, I shall drink, and what is more, I shall drink a generous amount." Thus one must always do the opposite of that which Satan prohibits. What do you think is my reason for drinking wine undiluted, talking freely, and eating more often, if it is not to torment and vex the devil who made up his mind to torment and vex me. Martin Luther

The best way to get rid of the Devil, if you cannot kill it with the words of Holy Scripture, is to rail at and mock him. Music, too, is very good; music is hateful to him, and drives him far away. Martin Luther

The Devil fears the word of God, He can't bite it; it breaks his teeth. Martin Luther

Almost every night when I wake up the devil is there and wants to dispute with me. I have come to this conclusion: When the argument that the Christian is without the law and above the law doesn't help, I instantly chase him away with a fart.--Martin Luther (1483-1546), Luther's Works, Volume 54, Table Talk_ [1967], Number 469)

Luther, in speaking of the good by itself and the good for its expediency alone, instances the observance of the Christian day of rest, -- a day of repose from manual labour, and of activity in spiritual labour, -- a day of joy and cooperation in the work of Christ's creation. "Keep it holy", says he, "for its use's sake -- both to body and soul! But if anywhere the day is made holy for the mere day's sake, -- if anywhere anyone sets up its observance upon a Jewish foundation, then I order you to work on it, to ride on it, to dance on it, to feast on it -- to do anything that shall reprove this encroachment on the Christian spirit and liberty."... Samuel Tayler Coleridge (1772-1834), Table Talk

 I felt myself absolutely born again. The gates of Paradise had been flung open and I had entered. There and then the whole of Scripture took on another look to me. --Martin Luther (1483-1546)

The wisdom of the Greeks, when compared to that of the Jews, is absolutely bestial; for apart from God there can be no wisdom, not any understanding and insight. --Martin Luther

It seems to me that the most delightful walk of life is to be found in a household of moderate means, to live there with an obliging spouse and to be satisfied with little. - Martin Luther DECEMBER 16, 1536, "Table Talk"

I have so much to do (today) that I should spend the first three hours in prayer. ... Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Riches are the pettiest and least worthy gifts which God can give a man. What are they to God's Word, to bodily gifts, such as beauty and health; or to the gifts of the mind, such as understanding, skill, and wisdom! Yet men toil for them day and night, and take no rest. Therefore God commonly gives riches to foolish people to whom he gives nothing else. --Martin Luther (1483-1546)

I never work better than when I am inspired by anger; for when I am angry, I can write, pray, and preach well, for then my whole temperament is quickened,my understanding sharpened, and all mundane vexations and temptations depart. Martin Luther (1483-1546), Table-Talk, 319

I have a better Caretaker than you and all the angels. He it is who lies in a manger ... but at the same time sits at the right hand of God, the almighty Father. Therefore be at rest. -- Martin Luther , letter to his wife Kate: 1546, eleven days before his death.

Pray, and let God worry. -- Martin Luther

Unless I am convicted by scripture and plain reason -- I do not accept the authority of the popes and councils, for they have contradicted each other -- my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and I will not recant anything for to go against conscience is neither right nor safe. God help me. Amen .
Martin Luther, at the Imperial Diet at Worms, 18 April 1521.

The anabaptists pretend that children, not as yet having reason, ought not to receive baptism. I answer: That reason in no way contributes to faith. Nay, in that children are destitute of reason, they are all the more fit and proper recipients of baptism. For reason is the greatest enemy that faith has: it never comes to the aid of spiritual things, but - more frequently than not - struggles against the Divine Word, treating with contempt all that emanates from God. If God can communicate the Holy Ghost to grown persons, he can, a fortiori, communicate it to young children. Faith comes of the Word of God, when this is heard; little children hear that Word when they receive baptism, and therewith they receive also faith.
Martin Luther (1483-1546), Table Talk CCCLIII [1569] .

Some one sent to know whether it was permissible to use warm water in baptism? The Doctor replied: "Tell the blockhead that water, warm or cold, is water. Martin Luther (1483-1546), Table Talk CCCLIV[1569].

There is not a word in the Bible which is extra cruem, which can be understood without reference to the cross.
MARTIN LUTHER

The Bible is the cradle wherein Christ is laid. Martin Luther

Either sin is with you, lying on your shoulders, or it is lying on Christ, the Lamb of God. Now if it is lying on your back, you are lost; but if it is resting on Christ, you are free, and you will be saved. Now choose what you want. --Martin Luther

Anything that one imagines of God apart from Christ is only useless thinking and vain idolatry. --Martin Luther

It is the duty of every Christian to be Christ to his neighbor. MARTIN LUTHER

Ah, we poor people, to be so cold and sluggish in the face of the great joy that has clearly been prepared for us! This great benefaction exceeds by far all the other works of creation; and yet our faith in it is found to be so weak, although it is preached and sung to us by angels, who are heavenly theologians and who were so glad for our sake! Their song is very, very beautiful and describes the entire Christian religion. For giving glory to God in the highest heaven is the supreme worship. This they wish and bring to us in the Christ ..
Martin Luther quoted in E. M. Plass, WHAT LUTHER SAYS, p.154

Let him who wants a true church cling to the Word by which everything is upheld. --Martin Luther

Next to faith this is the highest art -- to be content with the calling in which God has placed you. I have not learned it yet. -- Martin Luther

Our Lord has written the promise of the resurrection not in words alone,but in every leaf in springtime. --Martin Luther

Dear Kate, we arrived in Halle today at eight, but did not continue on to Eisleben because a big Anabaptist met us with waves and hunks of ice. She flooded the land and threathened to rebaptize us ... We take refreshment and comfort in good Torgau beer and Rhenish wine, waiting to see whether the Saale (river) will come down ... The devil resents us, and he is in the water - so better safe than sorry.
Martinn Luther to his wife:, in Theology of the Reformers, Timothy George.

I am afraid that the schools will prove the very gates of hell, unless they diligently labour in explaining the Holy Scriptures, and engraving them on the hearts of youth. I would advise no one to send his child where the Holy Scriptures are not supreme. Every institution in which men and women are not unceasingly occupied with the Word of God must be corrupt.--Martin Luther

The whole being of any Christian is Faith and Love... Faith brings the man to God, love brings him to men .
Martin Luther (1483-1546)

If any man doth ascribe aught of salvation, even the very least, to the free-will of man, he knoweth nothing of grace, and he hath not learnt Jesus Christ aright. Martin Luther

It is the most ungodly and dangerous business to abandon the certain and revealed will of God in order to search into the hidden mysteries of God. MARTIN LUTHER

Grace is given to heal the spiritually sick, not to decorate spiritual heroes. Martin Luther

If any man ascribes anything of salvation, even the very least thing, to the free will of man, he knows nothing of grace, and he has not learned Jesus Christ rightly. Martin Luther

Do not suppose that abuses are eliminated by destroying the object which is abused. Men can go wrong with wine and women. Shall we prohibit and abolish women? The sun, moon, and stars have been worshipped. Shall we pluck them out of the sky. Luther

Lord Jesus, you are my righteousness, I am your sin. You have taken upon yourself what is mine and given me what is yours. You have become what you were not so that I might become what I was not. MARTIN LUTHER

In Romans 7, St. Paul says, "The law is spiritual." What does that mean? If the law were physical, then it could be satisfied by works, but since it is spiritual, no one can satisfy it unless everything he does springs from the depths of the heart. But no one can give such a heart except the Spirit of God, who makes the person be like the law, so that he actually conceives a heartfelt longing for the law and henceforward does everything, not through fear or coercion, but from a free heart.-- Martin Luther (1483-1546), "Preface to the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans"

There is no more lovely, friendly and charming relationship, communion or company than a good marriage. -- Martin Luther

The state of matrimony is the chief in the world after religion; but people shun it because of its inconveniences, like one who, running out of the rain, falls into the river. Martin Luther, Table Talk

A marriage without children is the world without the sun. Augustine quoted in Martin Luther, Table Talk

Music makes people kinder, gentler, more staid and reasonable. The devil flees before the sound of music almost as much as before the word of God.
Martin Luther

Nothing on earth is so well-suited to make the sad merry, the merry sad, to give courage to the despairing, to make the proud humble, to lessen envy and hate, as music. Martin Luther

Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world. MARTIN LUTHER

It is the most ungodly and dangerous business to abandon the certain and revealed will of God in order to search in to the hidden mysteries of God. -- Martin Luther

Original sin is in us, like the beard. We are shaved today and look clean, and have a smooth chin; tomorrow our beard has grown again, nor does it cease growing while we remain on earth. --MARTIN LUTHER

Rest in the Lord; wait patiently for Him. In Hebrew, "Be silent in God, and let Him mould thee." Keep still, and He will mould thee to the right shape.
Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Whenever I happen to be prevented by the press of duties from observing my hour of prayer, the entire day is bad for me. MARTIN LUTHER

All who call on God in true faith, earnestly from the heart, will certainly be heard, and will receive what they have asked and desired, although not in the hour or in the measure, or the very thing which they ask; yet they will obtain something greater and more glorious than they had dared to ask. Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Grant that I may not pray alone with the mouth; help me that I may pray from the depths of my heart. Martin Luther

God has placed two ways before us in His Word: salvation by faith, damnation by unbelief (Mark 16:16). He does not mention purgatory at all. Nor is purgatory to be admitted, for it obscures the benefits and grace of Christ.
Martin Luther Table Talk

Dr. Henning asked: "Is reason to hold no authority at all with Christians, since it is to be set aside in matters of faith?" The Doctor replied: Before faith and the knowledge of God, reason is mere darkness; but in the hands of those who believe,'tis an excellent instrument. All facilities and gifts are pernicious, exercised by the impious; but most salutary when possessed by godly persons." Martin Luther (1483-1546), Table Talk, LXXVI. [1569]

Reason is the greatest enemy that faith has; it never comes to the aid of spiritual things, but--more frequently than not--struggles against the divine Word, treating with contempt all that emanates from God. Martin Luther (1483-1546), Table Talk [1569]

When God works in us, the will, being changed and sweetly breathed upon by the Spirit of God, desire and acts, not from compulsion, but responsively.
MARTIN LUTHER

When God wants to speak and deal with us, he does not avail himself of an angel but of parents, or the pastor, or of our neighbour. Martin Luther

God writes the gospel not in the Bible alone, but on trees, and flowers, and clouds, and stars. Martin Luther

It is just like someone who is sick, and who believes the doctor who promises his full recovery. In the meantime, he obeys the doctor's orders in the hope of the promised recovery, and abstains from those things which he was told to lay off, so that he may in no way hinder the promised return to health...Now is this sick man well? He is sick in reality - but he is well on account of a sure promise of the doctor, whom he trusts, and who reckons him as already being cured...So he is at one and the same time time both a sinner and righteous. He is a sinner in reality, but righteous by the sure imputation and promise of God that he will continue to deliver him from sin until he has completely cured him. So he is entirely healthy in hope, but a sinner in reality. MARTIN LUTHER, commenting on Romans

This life therefore is not righteousness but growth in righteousness; not health but healing, not being but becoming, not rest but exercise. We are not what we shall be but we are growing toward it; the process is not yet finished but it is going on; this is not the end but it is the road. All does not yet gleam in glory but all is being purified. -- MARTIN LUTHER

I am much afraid that schools will prove to be the great gates of Hell unless they diligently labor in explaining the Holy Scriptures, engraving them in the hearts of youth. I advise no one to place his child where the Scriptures do not reign paramount. Every institution in which men are not increasingly occupied with the Word of God must become corrupt. Martin Luther

I more fear what is within me than what comes from without. --MARTIN LUTHER

The best way to drive out the devil, if he will not yield to texts of Scripture, is to jeer and flout him,for he cannot bear scorn. Martin Luther

In the worst temptations nothing can help us but faith that God's Son has put on flesh, is bone, sits at the right hand of the Father, and prays for us. There is no mightier comfort.--Martin Luther

In this sort of temptation and struggle, contempt is the best and easiest method of winning over the devil. Laugh your adversary to scorn and ask who it is with whom you are talking. But by all means flee solitude, for the devil watches and lies in wait for you most of all when you are alone. This devil is conquered by mocking and despising him, not by resisting and arguing with him. Therefore, Jerome, joke and play games with your wife and others. In this way you will drive out your diabolical thoughts and take courage
Be of good courage, therefore, and cast these dreadful thoughts out of your mind. Whenever the devil pesters you with these thoughts, at once seek out the company of men, drink more, joke and jest, or engage in some other form of merriment. Sometimes it is necessary to drink a little more, play, jest, or even commit some infraction in defiance and contempt of the devil in order not to give him an opportunity to make us scrupulous about trifles. We shall be overcome if we worry too much about falling into some sin.
Accordingly if the devil should say, "Do not drink," you should reply to him, "On this very account, because you forbid it, I shall drink, and what is more, I shall drink a generous amount." Thus one must always do the opposite of that which Satan prohibits. What do you think is my reason for drinking wine undiluted, talking freely, and eating more often, if it is not to torment and vex the devil who made up his mind to torment and vex me. --Luther

If I profess with the loudest voice and clearest exposition every portion of the truth of God except precisely that little point which the world and the devil are at that moment attacking, I am not confessing Christ, however boldly I may be professing Christ. Where the battle rages, there the loyalty of the soldier is proved; and to be steady on all the battlefield besides, is mere flight and disgrace if he flinches at that point. --Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Peace if possible, truth at all costs. Martin Luther

The will is a beast of burden.
If God mounts it, it wishes and goes as God wills;
if Satan mounts it, it wishes and goes as Satan wills;
Nor can it choose its rider...
The riders contend for its possession.
Martin Luther (1483-1546)

The wisdom of the Greeks, when compared to that of the Jews, is absolutely bestial; for apart from God there can be no wisdom, not any understanding and insight. Martin Luther

No good ever came out of female domination. God created Adam master and lord of all living creatures, but Eve spoiled all. --Martin Luther, "Table Talk"(1532)

Who loves not woman, wine and song
Remains a fool his whole life long.
Martin Luther

If you are not allowed to laugh in heaven, I don't want to go there. --Martin Luther (1483-1546)

It is pleasing to God whenever thou rejoicest or laughest from the bottom of thy heart. --Martin Luther (1483-1546)

"It's true that a good diet is the best medicine when it suits the individual, but to live medically is to live wretchedly." Then he related some examples of deceased persons who starved themselves to death on the advice of their physicians. "I eat what I like and will die when God wills it."
Luther's Tabletalk from No.3801

He had a rose in his hand and marveled at it. "A glorious work of art by God," he said. "If a man had the capacity to make just one rose he would be given an empire! But the countless gifts of God are esteemed as nothing because they're always present. We see that God gives children to all men, the fruit of their bodies resembling the parents. A peasant is said to have three and four sons who look so much like him that they're easily mistaken for one another. All of these gifts are despised because they're always present. Luther's Tabletalk from No.4593

'When Luther's puppy [n. 116, Luther's dog Tölpel is mentioned again and again in the Table Talk.] happened to be at the table, looked for a morsel from his master, and watched with open mouth and motionless eyes, he [Martin Luther] said, "Oh, if I could only pray the way this dog watches the meat! All his thoughts are concentrated on the piece of meat. Otherwise he has no thought, wish, or hope.
Luther's Works, Volume 54, Table Talk (Philadelphia: 1967), pp. 37, 38. May 18, 1532

For some years now I have read through the Bible twice every year. If you picture the Bible to be a mighty tree and every word a little branch, I have shaken every one of these branches because I wanted to know what it was and what it meant. --Luther's Tabletalk No.1877

No good work is undertaken or done with wise reflection. It must all happen in a half-sleep. This is how I was forced to take up the office of teaching. If I had known what I know now, ten horses wouldn't have driven me to it. Moses and Jeremiah also complained that they were deceived. Nor would any man take a wife if he first gave real thought [to what might happen in marriage and the household]. Here Philip said that he had diligently observed that in history great deeds had never been done by old men. "This was so," said Luther, "when Alexander and Augustus were young; afterward men become too wise. They didn't do great things by deliberate choice but by a sort of impulse. If you young fellows were wise, the devil couldn't do anything to you, but since you aren't wise, you need us who are old. Our Lord God doesn't do great things except by violence, as they say." -- Luther's Tabletalk No. 406

Faith and the Spirit go together, but the Spirit is not always revealed.So Cornelius had the Holy Spirit before Peter came to him, although hedidn't know it. Those in the book of Acts who said, "We don't know the Holy Spirit," also had the Spirit, just as the patriarchs in the Old Testament had Christ, although they didn't know him. They clung to the word, and through it they received the Holy Spirit. Later in the book ofActs he was manifested to them outwardly. It's to be understood thus:The Word comes first, and with the Word the Spirit breathes upon my heart so that I believe. Then I feel that I have become a different person and I recognize that the Holy Spirit is there. Accordingly these are two things: to have the Holy Spirit and to know that you have him. When somebody speaks in your ear, you hardly hear his words before you feel his breath, so strong is the breath. Even so, when the Word is proclaimed, the Holy Spirit accompanies it and breathes upon your heart. -- Luther's Tabletalk No. 402

One ought to love one's neighbour with a love as chaste as that of a bridegroom for his bride. In this case all faults are concealed and covered over and only the virtues are seen. -- Luther's Tabletalk No. 217

Serve the Lord with fear, and exult with trembling" (Ps.2:11). Let somebody bring this into harmony for me: exult and fear! My son Hans can do it in relation to me, but I can't do it in relation to God. When I'm writing or doing something else, my Hans sings a little tune for me. If he becomes too noisy and I rebuke him a little for it, he continues to sing but does it more privately and with a certain awe and uneasiness. This is what God wishes: that we be always cheerful, but with reverence.-- Luther's Tabletalk (from No. 148)

Ever since the fall of Adam the world knows neither God nor his creation. It lives altogether outside of the glory of God. Oh, what thoughts man might have had about the fact that God is in all creatures, and so might have reflected on the power and the wisdom of God in even the smallest flowers! Of a truth, who can imagine how God creates, out of the parched soil, such a variety of flowers, such pretty colors, such sweet vernal grass, beyond anything that a painter or apothecary could make! Yet God can bring out of the ground such colors as green, yellow, red, blue, brown. Adam and those around him would have been elevated by all this to the praise of God, and they would have made use of all created things with thanksgiving. Now we enjoy all this to overflowing, yet without understanding, like cattle or other beasts trampling the most beautiful blossoms and lilies underfoot. -- Luther's Tabletalk from No.4201

That the Creator himself comes to us and becomes our ransom - this is the reason for our rejoicing.-- Martin Luther 25 March 1533 "Table Talks"

Let us act with humility, cast ourselves at one another's feet, join hands with each other, and help one another. For here we battle not against pope or emperor, but against the devil, and do you imagine that he is asleep?--Martin Luther

Junker Henry means to be God and do as he pleases.-Martin Luther on Henry VIII, as the King marries Catherine Parr on 12 July 1543.

All who call on God in true faith, earnestly from the heart, will certainly be heard, and will receive what they have asked and desired, although not in the hour or in the measure, or the very thing which they ask; yet they will obtain something greater and more glorious than they had dared to ask.... Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Pray, and let God worry. -Martin Luther [b. 11/10/1483], in the last letter written to his wife Katy, before his death on 2/18/1546]

If God promises something, then faith must fight a long and bitter fight, for reason or the flesh judges that God's promises are impossible. Therefore faith must battle against reason and its doubts............. Faith is something that is busy, powerful and creative, though properly speaking, it is essentially an enduring than a doing. It changes the mind and heart. While reason holds to what is present, faith apprehends the things that are not seen. Contrary to reason, faith regards the invisible things as already materialized. This explains why faith, unlike hearing is not found in many, for only few believe, while the great majority cling to the things that are present and can be felt and handled rather than to the Word. ~ Martin Luther, The Promises

If anywhere the day is made holy for the mere day's sake -- if anyone set up its observance on a Jewish foundation, then I order you to work on it, to ride on it, to dance on it, to feast on it, to do anything that shall remove this encroachment on Christian liberty.- Luther

Beautiful music is the art of the prophets that can calm the agitations of the soul; it is one of the most magnificent and delightful presents God has given us. --Martin Luther (1483-1546)

A good preacher should have these qualities and virtues: first, to teach systematically; second, he should have a ready wit; third, he should be eloquent; fourth, he should have a good voice; fifth, a good memory; sixth, he should know when to make an end; seventh, he should be sure of his doctrine; eighth, he should venture and engage body and blood, wealth and honor, in the world; ninth, he should suffer himself to be mocked and jeered of everyone.... Martin Luther (1483-1546), Table-Talk

Unless the gospel is preached with contemporary relevance it has not been preached. MARTIN LUTHER

The whole being of any Christian is Faith and Love...Faith brings the man to God, love brings him to men. ... Martin Luther (1483-1546)

William Lutz

Nothing in life is certain except Negative Patient Care Outcome and Revenue Enhancement.-- William Lutz, "DoubleSpeak"

Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919)

Without general elections, without unrestricted freedom of press and assembly, without a free struggle of opinion, life dies out in every public institution, becomes a mere semblance of life, in which only the bureaucracy remains as the active element.
Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919) In "The Russian Revolution," by Paul Froelich, ch. 6, 1940, tr. 1961.

Freedom is always and exclusively freedom for the one who thinks differently.
Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919) "Prison notes," 1918; in "The Russian Revolution," ch. 6, 1922, tr 1961.

John Lyly

A merry companion; is as good as a wagon. John Lyly

We might knit that knot with our tongues that we shall never undo with our teeth ~ John Lyly

Arthur Lynch

The only atheism is the denial of truth. --Arthur Lynch

Robert Lynd

Happy is the child whose father acquits himself with credit in the presence of its friends ~ Robert Lynd, The Blue Lion

The belief in the possibility of a short decisive war appears to be one of the most ancient and dangerous of human illusions. Robert Lynd

Henry Francis Lyte (1793-1847)

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide
The darkness deepens; Lord with me abide.
When other helpers fail and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day;
Earth's joys grow dim; its glories pass away;
Change and decay in all around I see;
O Thou who changest not, abide with me.

Not a brief glance I beg, a passing word;
But as Thou dwell'st with Thy disciples, Lord,
Familiar, condescending, patient, free.
Come not to sojourn, but abide with me.

Come not in terrors, as the King of kings,
But kind and good, with healing in Thy wings,
Tears for all woes, a heart for every plea&emdash;
Come, Friend of sinners, and thus abide with me.

Thou on my head in early youth didst smile;
And, though rebellious and perverse meanwhile,
Thou hast not left me, oft as I left Thee,
On to the close, O Lord, abide with me.

I need Thy presence every passing hour.
What but Thy grace can foil the tempter's power?
Who, like Thyself, my guide and stay can be?
Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless;
Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness.
Where is death's sting? Where, grave, thy victory?
I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

Hold Thou Thy cross before my closing eyes;
Shine through the gloom and point me to the skies.
Heaven's morning breaks, and earth's vain shadows flee;
In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.
Henry Francis Lyte - 1793-1847

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